allergic reactions – Parents Of Allergic Children http://parentsofallergicchildren.org/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 11:44:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-5.png allergic reactions – Parents Of Allergic Children http://parentsofallergicchildren.org/ 32 32 “Use every drop wisely” – New push to reduce unnecessary blood transfusions https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/use-every-drop-wisely-new-push-to-reduce-unnecessary-blood-transfusions/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 03:18:20 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/use-every-drop-wisely-new-push-to-reduce-unnecessary-blood-transfusions/ New clinical guidelines published today indicate that blood transfusions continue to be prescribed inappropriately in Australia and New Zealand. New recommendations published by Evolve and Choose Wisely Australia urge doctors to consider evidence-based guidelines for the appropriate use of blood and blood products. Dr Anastazia Keegan, Senior Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians […]]]>

New clinical guidelines published today indicate that blood transfusions continue to be prescribed inappropriately in Australia and New Zealand.

New recommendations published by Evolve and Choose Wisely Australia urge doctors to consider evidence-based guidelines for the appropriate use of blood and blood products.

Dr Anastazia Keegan, Senior Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and Vice-President of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Blood Transfusion, says: “Blood transfusions can save lives, but we still see a reliance on blood and blood products in circumstances where it has proved unnecessary.

“Blood transfusion is not without risks for patients. Most transfusion reactions are transient and easy to manage, such as febrile reactions, allergic reactions and circulatory overload associated with transfusion. However, some reactions are life-threatening, such as acute hemolytic reactions, transfusion-transmitted infections, transfusion-associated acute lung injury, and anaphylaxis.

“Blood is a rare and precious resource, so doctors must use it wisely.”

Evolve, an initiative led by the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, releases new recommendations each year to reduce low value care practices in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand.

These new evidence-based recommendations align with the Blood Stewardship Standard, one of eight National Health Service Quality and Safety Standards (NSQHS) developed to protect Australians from harm and improve health. quality of health service delivery.

Part of a global movement, Evolve is a flagship initiative led by physicians, specialties and the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP) to drive high-value, high-quality care in Australia and New Zealand. RACP is a founding member of Choose Wisely Australia, with all Evolve recommendations being part of the Choose Wisely Australia campaign.

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Epinephrine administered sublingually reaches therapeutic thresholds https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/epinephrine-administered-sublingually-reaches-therapeutic-thresholds/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 14:18:46 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/epinephrine-administered-sublingually-reaches-therapeutic-thresholds/ March 02, 2022 3 minute read Source/Disclosures Disclosures: Oppenheimer reports advisory board and consultant roles at Aquestive Therapeutics. Please see the abstract for relevant financial information from all other authors. ADD A SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALERTS Receive an email when new articles are published on Please provide your email […]]]>

March 02, 2022

3 minute read


Disclosures: Oppenheimer reports advisory board and consultant roles at Aquestive Therapeutics. Please see the abstract for relevant financial information from all other authors.


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PHOENIX — Epinephrine can achieve therapeutic plasma concentrations by sublingual administration, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Anaphylaxis is a medical condition that has faced a lack of innovation for decades,” John Oppenheimer, MD, clinical professor of medicine at Rutgers University UMDNJ School of Medicine and allergist at Pulmonary and Allergy Associates NJ, Healio told Healio.


Data are from Oppenheimer J, et al. Summary L37. Presented at: AAAAI Annual Meeting; February 25-28, 2022, Phoenix (hybrid meeting).

“Epinephrine has been used for over a century, but epinephrine auto-injectors are often underused due to a variety of factors, including needle phobia, late administration and non-carriage,” said he declared.

An alternative to injections

Many at-risk patients refuse to fill their prescriptions for injectable forms of epinephrine such as the EpiPen (Viatris/Mylan Inc.), Oppenheimer continued, while many who get their prescriptions don’t wear the device.

John Oppenheimer

“Therefore, a different treatment modality could address a significant unmet medical need resulting from autoinjector deficiencies and improve patient access, utilization, and therapeutic response,” Oppenheimer said.

Still, alternative routes of administration did not produce the rate and observed plasma levels (Cmax) that standard of care produces, Oppenheimer said. Aquestive Therapeutics then developed a polymer matrix-based sublingual film containing AQST-109, which is a prodrug of epinephrine, using the company’s PharmFilm technology.

The size of a postage stamp, the film dissolves on contact and is designed to be used in place of epinephrine injections in the emergency treatment of Type 1 allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis.

“Medical devices such as the EpiPen are often large, have temperature storage limitations, and require the patient or caregiver to be comfortable with an injection,” Oppenheimer said.

Aquestive Therapeutics used feedback from patients at risk for anaphylaxis and their caregivers and physicians that needle epinephrine auto-injectors are not optimal for administration.

“One of the most attractive attributes of the product for patients and parents of pediatric patients is that the medication is stored in a foil pouch that is similar in size and thickness to a business card. Also, as a clinician, I strongly believe that a significant difference is the oral application of the product,” Oppenheimer said.

“Given the product’s small size, portability, and needle-free delivery, the AQST-109 has the ability to dramatically improve how patients and caregivers manage anaphylaxis,” he said. he continued.

Study results

The phase 1 study was designed to provide the first human data for the film. It involved 12 healthy male volunteers who were randomly assigned to receive formulation one (F1) or two (F2) of AQST-109.

The researchers measured the volunteers’ systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate before dosing and up to 6 hours after. Adverse events and local tolerance were also monitored.

Both F1 and F2 doses of AQST-109 were absorbed and rapidly converted to epinephrine with an observed median time to reach maximum drug concentration (Tmax) of 15 minutes. In previous studies, EpiPen dosing had a median Tmax of 22 minutes.

“In the study, AQST-109 sublingual film demonstrated consistent Tmax values ​​in a narrower range than reported for injectable epinephrine,” Oppenheimer said. “Its range was narrower compared to the range of injectable epinephrine from both our historical data and published literature.”

Additionally, the 12 mg dose of F1 resulted in a geometric mean Cmax of 552 pg/mL, and the 12 mg dose of F2 resulted in a geometric mean Cmax of 762 pg/mL. The EpiPen dosage has a geometric mean Cmax of 341 pg/mL, according to previous studies.

“This is the first time that epinephrine has been shown to achieve therapeutic plasma concentrations after sublingual administration,” Oppenheimer said.

AQST-109 also produced results comparable to previous Auvi-Q (kaelo, Inc.) studies, the researchers added.

Additionally, it produced significant changes in blood pressure and heart rate that were comparable to epinephrine auto-injectors.

Doses of all formulations and levels were generally well tolerated with no serious adverse effects, significant medical events, or serious treatment-related adverse events.

Noting that AQST-109 produced pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) responses within the expected therapeutic range, the researchers concluded that AQST-109 showed promise as a viable alternative for the treatment of anaphylaxis.

Aquestive Therapeutics is now awaiting data from its three-part EPIPHAST pilot study, which will examine the PK and PD values ​​of AQST-109 compared to epinephrine injections.

“EPIPHAST is designed to demonstrate important safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetic information regarding AQST-109 that will define the eventual dose and final formulation for a future bioequivalence study with epinephrine [intramuscular] injection,” Oppenheimer said.

Aquestive Therapeutics aims to complete the EPIPHAST study in the first half of 2022.

“I look forward to seeing the data and continuing the discussion on this exciting program,” Oppenheimer said.

Reference:

  • OppenheimerJ, et al. Summary L37. Presented at: AAAAI Annual Meeting; February 25-28, 2022; Phoenix (hybrid meeting).

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Are you allergic to your home? How to identify allergens in each room https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/are-you-allergic-to-your-home-how-to-identify-allergens-in-each-room/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 23:38:47 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/are-you-allergic-to-your-home-how-to-identify-allergens-in-each-room/ You don’t have to go outside to experience allergy symptoms. If you have itchy, red eyes and are sneezing and haven’t even come out, the problem may be inside the House. “Allergy and asthma control starts at home. Many allergy sufferers stay indoors when pollen is high, but dust mites, pet dander, mold, and even […]]]>

You don’t have to go outside to experience allergy symptoms. If you have itchy, red eyes and are sneezing and haven’t even come out, the problem may be inside the House.

“Allergy and asthma control starts at home. Many allergy sufferers stay indoors when pollen is high, but dust mites, pet dander, mold, and even cockroaches can cause problems indoors,” says Kenneth MendezPresident and CEO of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America.

Allergic rhinitis affects 5.2 million children and 19.2 million adults, according to the foundation. There may be triggers in your home, right under your nose, that are contributing to your constant sniffles and sneezes. Here’s how to deal with allergens in each room.

Bedroom

You spend a lot of time in your bedroom, so experts recommend making it an allergy-free zone.

“The most common allergy triggers inside the home are dust mites, which collect in mattresses and bedding, and pet dander,” says Dr. Stanley Finemanallergist and spokesperson for the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology.

Wash bedding once a week in hot water and consider using mattress and pillow covers. Keep pets out of the bedroom; but if that’s not an option, bathing your dog more frequently can help reduce dander.

Experts also recommend putting an air purifier in your bedroom. When choosing one, be sure to consider the size of the room.

“Most of the time you get what you pay for, so check out a reputable HVAC company for the best suggestions for you and your family,” says Dr. Franklyn R. Gergitswho specializes in ear, nose, throat, and otolaryngology allergies at the Sinus and Allergy Wellness Center in Arizona.

Bathroom

Bathrooms without windows or good ventilation can be perfect environments for mold and mildew.

“To control mold growth, it’s important to fix any leaks in or near the shower, sink, toilet, or tub,” Mendez says. “Standing water will contribute to mold growth.”

Always wear protective clothing, gloves and a mask when handling mold-damaged materials, he says, and use disposable rags or sponges to avoid spreading mold spores to other parts of the home. .

“Use dehumidifiers or exhaust fans, or open a window, to help reduce humidity in bathrooms or other rooms in your home,” says Fineman.

Run an exhaust fan for at least 15-20 minutes after showering.

Food

In the kitchen, Mendez recommends checking all water lines such as sinks and dishwashers for leaks, as mold can grow around water sources. It can also grow in garbage cans, refrigerator gaskets, and cabinets, so check those areas as well and get rid of the mold immediately by cleaning with soap.

“Cockroaches are a common pest that can also be a source of allergens. Similar to dust mites, the cockroach’s waste and body can trigger allergic reactions in sensitive people,” Mendez says.

Avoid cockroaches by not leaving water and food sources outside at night. Also store your pet’s dishes and food.

Basement

Basements can also promote mold growth and cause allergic reactions.

“The lack of ventilation, humidity, and dark basements make this room a breeding ground for mold,” Mendez says. “Improving ventilation can help reduce humidity in basements, as can using a dehumidifier.”

Clutter attracts dust, so keep rooms open and clean. Avoid carpeting and consider cork flooring, as it is naturally antimicrobial and flame retardant. If you still want carpet, wool is a good option. Area rugs attract dust and dirt, but no pile or low pile is a better option.

“Be sure to check for signs of damp on walls and windows,” Mendez says. “Fix leaks, remove mold-damaged materials, and clean up moldy materials that cannot be replaced.”

The living room

The living room gets a lot of traffic, making it a focal point for irritants and allergens that affect indoor air quality.

Avoid fabric curtains as they accumulate dust. Instead, use bamboo or wood window treatments. Leather or imitation leather furniture can be cleaned of dust. Also keep pets away from furniture.

“Choose leather or vinyl furniture over fabric pieces, take pillows out, and opt for window shades instead of curtains,” Mendez says.

You can also try using an air purifier to remove airborne allergens in the living room, Mendez says. Consider the Dyson Pure Cool Purifier Tower Fan ($595, walmart.com).

“Wash blankets and rugs weekly in hot water,” Mendez says. “If you have carpet, consider replacing it with hard flooring if possible. If hard flooring isn’t an option, vacuum the carpet once a week.

Run the air conditioner, but change or clean the filters once a month for window units and every three months for central air systems.

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Mylan Agrees to $264 Million Settlement in Kansas City, Kansas, Litigation Over EpiPen Price Hikes | KCUR 89.3 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/mylan-agrees-to-264-million-settlement-in-kansas-city-kansas-litigation-over-epipen-price-hikes-kcur-89-3/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 21:42:07 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/mylan-agrees-to-264-million-settlement-in-kansas-city-kansas-litigation-over-epipen-price-hikes-kcur-89-3/ The company formerly known as Mylan Inc. has agreed to pay $264 million to resolve a class action lawsuit over huge EpiPen price hikes. The settlement — if approved in a federal court in Kansas City, Kansas — comes on top of a $345 million settlement last year of the same lawsuit by Pfizer Inc. […]]]>

The company formerly known as Mylan Inc. has agreed to pay $264 million to resolve a class action lawsuit over huge EpiPen price hikes.

The settlement — if approved in a federal court in Kansas City, Kansas — comes on top of a $345 million settlement last year of the same lawsuit by Pfizer Inc.

Mylan reached a settlement agreement shortly before the case went to trial on Feb. 22, and terms were disclosed in court documents on Monday.

Mylan is now known as Viatris Inc. and is based in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. The company did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The settlement still needs to be approved by U.S. District Judge Daniel Crabtree, who is overseeing the litigation. But because the settlement is very similar to the one reached with Pfizer, which Crabtree approved last year, he should give it the green light.

The litigation dates back more than five years, when numerous class action lawsuits were filed against Pfizer, Mylan and other defendants by consumers and insurers.

EpiPens are self-injectable devices that deliver epinephrine, a drug used to treat life-threatening allergic reactions known as anaphylaxis. It is most commonly caused by food allergies, but can also be caused by insect bites, medications, and other substances.

The lawsuits alleged that Mylan, Pfizer and their affiliates engaged in an unlawful scheme to monopolize the EpiPen market by raising the price of the device from $100 to $600 and offering rebates and rebates to managers of pharmaceutical benefits and insurers in exchange for their commitment not to reimburse competitors. some products. The price of the epinephrine dose of EpiPen has remained at around $1.

The lawsuits also alleged that the companies obtained overlapping patents on minor modifications to the EpiPen, then engaged in bogus patent litigation to prevent generic competition.

Additionally, they accused Mylan of offering public schools free or discounted EpiPens on the condition that the schools enter into exclusive contracts with the company. Mylan reportedly spent $4 million lobbying Congress to pass the Emergency Epinephrine School Access Act, which became law in 2013 and gives federal funding priority to schools that stock EpiPens .

During a September 2016 congressional hearing, the late Rep. Elijah Cummings, the ranking Democrat on the House Oversight Committee, accused Heather Bresch, then CEO of Mylan, of exploiting a “cheap old drug that doesn’t ‘has virtually no competition’ and raise ‘the price and again and again as high as you can.

Even though Mylan raised the price of EpiPens, Bresch, the daughter of Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia, was rewarded with pay raises that saw her pay jump from about $2.5 million in 2007 to nearly $19 million in 2015, more than a seven-fold increase. This sparked fury from EpiPen users, many of whom said they could no longer afford the device.

Bresch stepped down as CEO of Mylan in 2020 after Mylan merged with Pfizer’s Upjohn unit to form Viatris.

In 2017, Mylan paid the federal government $465 million for misclassifying the EpiPen as a generic drug, allowing it to overcharge Medicaid by $1.27 billion.

And in 2019, he paid $30 million to settle a case brought by the Securities and Exchange Commission, which alleged Mylan failed to disclose to investors the government’s investigation into whether it overcharged Medicaid.

Last year, Crabtree dismissed racketeering claims against Mylan and Bresch, ruling that the plaintiffs failed to show that mail or wire fraud resulted in inflated prices for the EpiPen. But he declined to dismiss the antitrust claims based on a settlement Mylan reached with generic drug maker Teva in 2012. The settlement required Teva to wait until 2015 to launch a generic product comparable to the EpiPen.

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IgGenix Announces Food Allergy Research Presentation at American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting | national company https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/iggenix-announces-food-allergy-research-presentation-at-american-academy-of-allergy-asthma-immunology-annual-meeting-national-company/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 14:02:07 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/iggenix-announces-food-allergy-research-presentation-at-american-academy-of-allergy-asthma-immunology-annual-meeting-national-company/ SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.– (BUSINESS WIRE) – February 23, 2022– IgGenix, Inc., a biotechnology company taking a breakthrough approach to directly alleviating allergic disease, today announced a poster presentation at the upcoming American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) Annual Meeting that will will be held February 25-28, 2022, in Phoenix, Arizona. “IgGenix is […]]]>

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.– (BUSINESS WIRE) – February 23, 2022–

IgGenix, Inc., a biotechnology company taking a breakthrough approach to directly alleviating allergic disease, today announced a poster presentation at the upcoming American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) Annual Meeting that will will be held February 25-28, 2022, in Phoenix, Arizona.

“IgGenix is ​​deeply invested in transforming the approach to allergy treatment by leading the way in scientific research to understand allergy at the molecular level,” said IgGenix Co-Founder and Chief Technology Officer Derek Croote, Ph.D. “We look forward to reuniting with other leaders in the food allergy community and providing insight into how our research has the potential to revolutionize the standard of allergy care for millions. of people who suffer from allergic diseases, including myself.”

Food allergies affect approximately 32 million Americans and 200 million people worldwide, and their incidence is increasing. Every three minutes, someone goes to the emergency room with foodborne anaphylaxis. IgGenix is ​​committed to developing safer treatments with faster onset of action and more sustained clinical response through monoclonal antibody re-engineering.

Presentation Details:

IgE-mediated Reactions and Anaphylaxis: New Mechanisms and Strategies for Therapeutic Intervention (485)

  • Overview: Blood from highly allergic donors produces high affinity IgE antibodies against food and non-food allergens
  • Date and time: Sunday, February 27, 4:45 p.m. – 6:15 p.m. MST
  • Location: Convention Center, North Building, 100 Level, 120 Concourse; also available to virtual AAAAI Annual Meeting attendees via the Virtual Poster Room

The summary will also appear in the February 2022 issue of The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

About IgGenix

IgGenix is ​​a privately held biotechnology company taking a breakthrough approach to directly relieve food allergies and other severe allergies by rearranging key antibodies involved in the allergic cascade. Based on the research of Stanford University Professors Stephen Quake, Kari Nadeau and Derek Croote, IgGenix isolates allergen-specific IgE antibodies and transforms them into IgG antibodies that mitigate and possibly prevent the allergic cascade. This new approach can prevent life-threatening allergic reactions, save lives and reduce the constant fear that plagues people with severe allergies. For more information, visit www.IgGenix.com.

Show source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220223005191/en/

CONTACT: For investor inquiries:

Jessica Grosman

jgrossman@iggenix.com

For media inquiries:

Janine Bogris

202-470-5213

jbogris@jpa.com

KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA CALIFORNIA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: BIOTECHNOLOGY GENERAL HEALTH HEALTH PHARMACEUTICALS CLINICAL TRIALS

SOURCE: IgGenix, Inc.

Copyright BusinessWire 2022.

PUBLISHED: 02/23/2022 09:00 AM / DISK: 02/23/2022 09:02 AM

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220223005191/en

Copyright BusinessWire 2022.

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DBV Technologies will participate in the next AAAAI 2022 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/dbv-technologies-will-participate-in-the-next-aaaai-2022/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/dbv-technologies-will-participate-in-the-next-aaaai-2022/ Montrouge, France, February 22, 2022 DBV Technologies for Participate to come AAAAI 2022 Congress DBV Technologies (Euronext: DBV – ISIN: FR0010417345 – Nasdaq Stock Market: DBVT), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company, today announced its upcoming participation in the annual scientific meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI), February 24 – February 28, […]]]>

Montrouge, France, February 22, 2022

DBV Technologies for Participate to come AAAAI 2022 Congress

DBV Technologies (Euronext: DBV – ISIN: FR0010417345 – Nasdaq Stock Market: DBVT), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company, today announced its upcoming participation in the annual scientific meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI), February 24 – February 28, 2022. Two scientific presentations were accepted, including a clinical poster and a non-clinical poster. DBV will also have a booth in the AAAAI exhibit hall.

Data that will be presented from the non-clinical poster will discuss the effect of specialist allergy care on health care utilization among children with peanut allergy in the United States, suggesting that allergy care was associated with reduced total health care costs and higher rates of epinephrine prescription. . In addition, the clinical poster will present pooled safety data from phase 3 studies of epicutaneous immunotherapy with investigational Viaskin Peanut 250 mcg in children aged 4 to 11 years, after treatment for up to 36 months in children with peanut allergy. These data informed DBV’s understanding of the healthcare ecosystem and the value proposition of Viaskin Peanut in children with food allergies.

“The data we are presenting at AAAAI this year highlights the safety and tolerability potential of epicutaneous immunotherapy and the Viaskin™ platform,” said Dr. Pharis Mohideen, Chief Medical Officer of DBV Technologies. “I am delighted that we are engaging in in-depth discussions about the potential benefits of using the Viaskin™ platform to treat peanut allergy in children and to further our understanding of how the intervention of a allergist may have wider implications in the healthcare system.”

Viaskin™ Peanut (DBV712 250 μg) is the Company’s lead product candidate designed to potentially reduce the risk of allergic reactions in peanut-allergic children aged 4-11 years due to accidental exposure to peanuts. An experimental, non-invasive, once-daily patch, Viaskin Peanut seeks to deliver micrograms of peanut antigen to activate the immune system. Viaskin Peanut is DBV’s innovative approach to epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT), a method of delivering biologically active compounds to the immune system through intact skin.

DBV summaries:

Scientist Presentations

Both e-posters will be accompanied by recorded presentations from the authors and will be available upon request at https://annualmeeting.aaaai.org/ beginning Friday, February 25, 2021.

Please note that only registered attendees will be able to access the Poster Room, which is available through the AAAAI Virtual Platform. After the meeting, these presentations will be available on DBV’s website, www.dbv-technologies.com, for those unable to attend.

Effect of specialty allergy care on health care utilization among children with peanut allergy in the United States will be presented by Dr. Matthew J. Greenhawt, MD, Children’s Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado, Aurora, Denver.

  • Abstract number: 120
  • Date: February 26, 2022, 9:45-10:45 a.m.
  • Location: Convention Center, North Building, Lower Level, Hall 4

Pooled Safety Data from Phase 3 Studies of Epicutaneous Immunotherapy for Peanut Allergy in Children 4-11 Years of Age will be presented by Dr. Rachel G. Robison, MD, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee

  • Abstract number: 097
  • Date: February 26, 2022, 9:45-10:45 a.m.
  • Location: Convention Center, North Building, Lower Level, Hall 4

About DBV Technologies
DBV Technologies is developing Viaskin™, an exclusive research technology platform with broad potential applications in immunotherapy. Viaskin is based on Epicutaneous Immunotherapy, or EPIT™, DBV’s method of delivering biologically active compounds to the immune system through intact skin. With this new class of non-invasive product candidates, the Company is committed to safely transforming the care of patients with food allergies. DBV’s food allergy programs include ongoing clinical trials of Viaskin Peanut. DBV Technologies has its global headquarters in Montrouge, France and offices in Bagneux, France, and North American operations in Summit, NJ and New York, NY. The ordinary shares of the Company are listed on compartment B of Euronext Paris (Ticker: DBV, ISIN code: FR0010417345) and the ADSs of the Company (each representing half of an ordinary share) are listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market (Mnemo: DBVT) .

Forward-looking statements
This press release may contain forward-looking statements and estimates, including statements regarding the therapeutic potential of Viaskin™ Peanut as a treatment for children with peanut allergy and the potential benefits of EPIT. These forward-looking statements and estimates are neither promises nor guarantees and involve substantial risks and uncertainties. At this stage, the Company’s products have not been authorized for sale in any country. Among the factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described or projected herein are the uncertainties generally associated with research and development, clinical trials and related regulatory reviews and approvals, including impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, and whether preclinical data or initial or interim clinical trial results will be predictive of future or final clinical trial results or future trial results. Additionally, the timing of any action by a regulatory entity cannot be guaranteed, particularly in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. A more detailed list and description of such risks, uncertainties and other risks can be found in the Company’s regulatory filings with the French Autorité des marchés financiers, the Company’s Securities and Exchange Commission documents and reports, including in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019, and the Company’s future filings and reports. Existing and potential investors are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements and estimates, which speak only as of the date hereof. Except as required by applicable law, DBV Technologies assumes no obligation to update or revise the information contained in this press release.

Investor RContact
Anne Pollack
DBV Technologies
+1 (857) 529-2363
anne.pollak@dbv-technologies.com

Media Contact
Angela Marcucci
DBV Technologies
+1 (646) 842-2393
angela.marcucci@dbv-technologies.com

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These 2 grocery items are removed from the shelves https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/these-2-grocery-items-are-removed-from-the-shelves/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 23:05:00 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/these-2-grocery-items-are-removed-from-the-shelves/ The mass manufacturing process associated with the products that fill the grocery store shelves that we depend on for food and other household staples, of course, has many benefits. Efficiency helps keep prices capped (well, at least a bit). But the whole process is certainly not perfect, far from it. Mistakes can happen anytime along […]]]>

The mass manufacturing process associated with the products that fill the grocery store shelves that we depend on for food and other household staples, of course, has many benefits. Efficiency helps keep prices capped (well, at least a bit). But the whole process is certainly not perfect, far from it. Mistakes can happen anytime along the way and ultimately lead to a seemingly endless series of food recalls that we unfortunately have to report on regularly.

As if shoppers didn’t have enough to worry about, from inflation driving up prices to product shortages and more. Food recalls then add an even more worrying aspect to all this, since the cause of this recall can potentially put your health at risk. Below, we’ll run through some recent recalls you should know about and tell you everything you need to know about them.

Food Recalls: Toboton Creek Dairy Raw Milk

For this first, the key fact to know is that some Toboton Creek Dairy products may have been contaminated with E. coli. The company says the reminder follows routine sampling by the Washington State Department of Agriculture.

Here is what the tests revealed: The presence of E. coli, found in retail raw milk dated February 1. As a result, Toboton Creek Dairy is recalling all raw whole milk at retail with “Best By” dates from February 1 through February 9.

The product was available at retail stores in Yelm and Olympia, Washington, as well as available directly from area farms. It should also be noted that Toboton Creek Dairy said this recall affected raw milk bottled by the company in half-gallon containers.

As of this writing, fortunately, there have been no reports of illness linked to this raw milk recall. Still, Toboton Creek Dairy urges customers not to drink any of the raw milk products with the expiration dates listed above. And they can get a full refund by returning their item to the original point of purchase.

Wish-Bone Dressing Recall

In addition to the many salad recalls we’ve reported over the past few weeks, Conagra Brands has just issued a recall for several popular Wish-Bone dressings. Some of them are popular enough that you still have them in your fridge right now.

We don’t know for sure how many bottles of salad dressing are part of this food recall. The company only said in an ad that it is recalling an unspecified “limited quantity” of Wish-Bone Thousand Island and Chunky Blue Cheese dressings containing undeclared egg.

The fact that they contain eggs without the label clearly stating this is, of course, potentially dangerous. Because people with egg allergies, among other things, can develop symptoms minutes after consuming the allergen. Severe allergic reactions can even lead to anaphylaxis, which can be fatal.

If you purchased one of the company’s salad dressings and think you might be affected by this food recall, here are the identifiers you should look for:

  • Thousand Island Dressings, 15 oz – UPC: 0-41321-00645-6; Batch/Lot Code: 4254200620; BEST BY JAN312023
  • Thousand Island Dressings, 15 oz – UPC: 0-41321-00645-6; Batch/Lot Code: 4254200720; BEST BY FEB012023
  • Thousand Island Dressings, 24 oz – UPC: 0-41321-00731-6; Batch/Lot Code: 4254201720; BEST BEFORE FEBRUARY 11, 2023
  • Blue Cheese Chunky Dressings, 24 oz – UPC: 0-41321-00691-3; Batch/Lot Code: 4254201320; BEST BY NOV092022
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Covid recall crisis as allergy sufferers told they could get vaccinated by Pfizer https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/covid-recall-crisis-as-allergy-sufferers-told-they-could-get-vaccinated-by-pfizer/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 14:22:25 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/covid-recall-crisis-as-allergy-sufferers-told-they-could-get-vaccinated-by-pfizer/ The message that Pfizer is not suitable for allergy sufferers, especially those with a history of anaphylaxis, has spread everywhere – but it’s just not true People with allergies report sting problems ( Image: Getty Images) Allergy sufferers are urged to come forward and receive their booster shots after concerns about anaphylactic reactions have ‘no […]]]>

The message that Pfizer is not suitable for allergy sufferers, especially those with a history of anaphylaxis, has spread everywhere – but it’s just not true

People with allergies report sting problems

Allergy sufferers are urged to come forward and receive their booster shots after concerns about anaphylactic reactions have ‘no scientific basis’.

Many report being turned away from vaccination centers because they tell staff they have a history of anaphylaxis to food, venom or an identified drug.

Health workers are often misinformed that they should give allergy sufferers an AstraZeneca vaccine as a booster, according to allergy charities.

Allergy UK and The Anaphylaxis Campaign say they are facing a deluge of desperate demands in response to the Government’s promotion of the importance and urgency of booster vaccinations.

Previous reports led allergy sufferers to believe that Pfizer’s preferred booster would put them at risk of anaphylaxis.







People with allergies can get Pfizer bites
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The two charities, along with the British Society for Allergy & Clinical Immunology (BSACI), are now calling for urgent action to share the latest Green Book vaccination guidelines.

The Green Book contains the latest information on vaccines and vaccination procedures, for vaccine-preventable infectious diseases in the UK.

Charities say the green paper should reassure the majority of the allergic population, who have largely received AstraZeneca for the first and second doses, that they can safely receive the Pfizer vaccine as a booster.

A spokeswoman for Allergy UK said: “The initial concerns of allergy sufferers were alleviated three weeks after they were raised, when the MHRA guidelines were overturned.

“Two healthcare workers reportedly suffered anaphylactic reactions to their Pfizer vaccines during the first week of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout in December 2020.







Healthcare workers are urged to check the green paper
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“But, upon investigation, there was no scientific basis for concern for the vast majority of people with food allergies, venom (bees and wasps) or known medications, even if they had previously experienced anaphylaxis. .”

She added: “Unfortunately, the message that Pfizer was not suitable for allergy sufferers, and particularly people with a history of anaphylaxis, has spread widely.

“It has proven extremely difficult to correct this message.

“When the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine was approved, allergy sufferers of all types were often told that AstraZeneca was better suited and safer for them.

“So they got their two doses of this vaccine instead.

“It was despite the advice at the time being very clear that there was NO REASON for them to fear the Pfizer vaccine.”







People with allergies can get Pfizer bites
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The AstraZeneca vaccine is also difficult to organize as a booster and is not usually offered at booster clinics.

As a result, charities report that patients often end up circling between their GP and 119 operators, who are often unable to provide advice.

The ingredient in the Pfizer vaccine that originally caused concern is called polyethylene glycol (PEG for short, and also known as Macrogol) and is a common ingredient in medications.

Most allergic reactions caused by PEG have resulted from laxatives and certain types of steroid injections, but this is an extremely rare cause of anaphylactic reactions and only people with a history of anaphylaxis immediately after having taken medications containing PEG should consult a specialist before vaccination. .

As the vaccine rollout continues, studies have shown that even people known or suspected to have a PEG allergy can be safely vaccinated with the Pfizer vaccine.

There has been only one case report in the medical literature of anaphylaxis with the Pfizer vaccine caused by PEG.

Allergy UK says: “You CAN have a Pfizer or Moderna booster if:

  • you have any type of FOOD allergy (including anaphylaxis)
  • you have had anaphylaxis from WASP or BEE stings
  • you have an identified allergy to most medications
  • all current or recent medications that you have taken safely contain polyethylene glycol (PEG/Macrogol)”

The charity added: “You should seek further allergy advice if you have had immediate anaphylaxis to several unrelated medicines containing polyethylene glycol (PEG/Macrogol). You can check the ingredients of the medicines at medicines.org.uk if you’re not sure.”

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Goji Berries Distributed in Multiple States Recalled for Undeclared Sulfites https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/goji-berries-distributed-in-multiple-states-recalled-for-undeclared-sulfites/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 04:05:10 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/goji-berries-distributed-in-multiple-states-recalled-for-undeclared-sulfites/ KEY POINTS Dr Snack Goji Berry has been distributed in several states including New York and Delaware Consumption of 10mg of sulfites has been reported to cause “severe reactions” in some asthmatics Consumers who purchased the recalled product can obtain a full refund New York-based BCS International is recalling its goji berry products because they […]]]>

KEY POINTS

  • Dr Snack Goji Berry has been distributed in several states including New York and Delaware
  • Consumption of 10mg of sulfites has been reported to cause “severe reactions” in some asthmatics
  • Consumers who purchased the recalled product can obtain a full refund

New York-based BCS International is recalling its goji berry products because they may contain undeclared sulfites. Those who are sensitive or allergic to it can have severe allergic reactions.

Trouble is, the company’s “Dr. Snack Goji Berry” was discovered after routine sampling by the New York State Department of Agriculture and Food Markets. Inspectors revealed the presence of sulfites, which were not declared on the label, the company announced on the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website. Noted.

Sulfites are chemicals that are used as preservatives in foods and beverages, the Cleveland Clinic Explain. These can be found in various products and were even widely used in the 1970s and 1980s.

However, sulphites can cause asthma and allergy symptoms, ranging from “light wheezing” to life-threatening anaphylactic shock. Due to severe sulfite reactions, in 1986 the FDA banned the use of sulfites on fresh fruits and vegetables. Additionally, in products such as dried fruits, the use of sulfites in the production process or as an ingredient must be declared on the label, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Noted.

According to the company, it has previously been reported that consuming 10 milligrams of sulphites per serving can induce “severe reactions” in some asthmatics and can even lead to anaphylactic shock in some sulphite-sensitive people – if they consume 10 milligrams or more. That’s why it’s important for people with a sulfite allergy to always check food labels.

The affected products contained 13.6 milligrams of sulphites per serving. Fortunately, the company has not received any reports of allergic reactions or product-related illnesses as of the recall date.

The products affected by the call back are Dr. Snack Goji Berry products that arrived in 4.5 ounce, 6 ounce, and 9 ounce plastic containers and 5 pound cardboard packaging. They have UPC codes 80555492205, 80555493218, 80555494216 or 80555470198 and were distributed in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Delaware.

People who have purchased an affected product are advised to return it to where they purchased it for a full refund. Anyone with questions about the recall may contact the company at 718-392-3355.

Representative image of goji berries. Photo: Pixabay

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Goji berries sold in New York City recalled due to possible severe allergic reactions https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/goji-berries-sold-in-new-york-city-recalled-due-to-possible-severe-allergic-reactions/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 19:16:33 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/goji-berries-sold-in-new-york-city-recalled-due-to-possible-severe-allergic-reactions/ NEW YORK (WWTI) – BCS International Corp. recalls many of their “Dr. Snack Goji Berry” products that have been sold in New York and other states. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the recall comes after routine sampling was conducted by New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets food inspectors. Sampling revealed […]]]>

NEW YORK (WWTI) – BCS International Corp. recalls many of their “Dr. Snack Goji Berry” products that have been sold in New York and other states.

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the recall comes after routine sampling was conducted by New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets food inspectors. Sampling revealed the presence of sulphites in the products. This has raised concerns as they are not declared on the label.

The FDA explained that consuming 10 milligrams of sulfites per serving has been reported to cause severe reactions in some asthmatics. Analysis of “Dr. Snack Goji Berry” revealed that they contained 13.6 milligrams per serving. However, no illnesses or allergic reactions involving the product have been reported to date.

As a result, the company recalled its 4.5-ounce, 6-ounce, and 9-ounce containers and 5-pound packages of “Dr. “Snack Goji Berry” treats. Product ships in clear plastic containers and 5-pound cardboard boxes with UPC codes 80555492205, 80555493218, 80555494216, or 80555470198.

Consumers who purchased 4.5-ounce, 6-ounce, or 9-ounce containers or 5-pound packages of “Dr. Snack Goji Berry” are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. More product and recall information can be found on the FDA’s website.

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