Solve the problem of peanut allergies

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Recently I have found parents shocked to ask me about peanut allergies. Humorous puns aside, peanut allergies are serious, so let me give you some background on this topic. How widespread is peanut allergy? About 2% of children in the United States are allergic to peanuts and half of them are also allergic to tree nuts such as almonds, walnuts, pecans, cashews, and sometimes even sunflower seeds. and sesame. In fact, peanut allergy is the leading cause of death related to food allergies in this country. if untreated has difficulty breathing, a drop in blood pressure and in turn becoming unconscious. We used to recommend not to try a peanut in a child until he was old enough to talk to us. But there is now more recent data suggesting that while there is no known family history of peanut allergy, exposure of infants to peanut products, such as a very thin layer of butter. peanut on a cracker when they are old enough to solidify, may reduce the risk of developing a peanut allergy as they age. On the other hand, if there is a family history of peanut allergy, severe eczema, or egg allergy, it is recommended that you speak with your child’s doctor before introducing your child to peanuts. . Usually a skin or blood test can determine if your child is at risk for peanut allergy. Dealing with a Diagnosis If the diagnosis is made, the best way to deal with this problem is to avoid the foods that trigger it. This requires not only educating a child and his or her family, but also friends, parents, caregivers and teachers. It also means checking food labels and informing restaurants of the allergy, to avoid accidental exposure. If exposed, older children and adults with allergies to peanuts should take a self-injectable dose of epinephrine with them. The vaccine should also be available to teachers, school nurses and parents, especially if the child is too young to self-inject. After the injection is done, the child should be taken to an emergency center for continued observation and treatment, as this is a true medical emergency. A medical alert bracelet is also a good idea. Hopefully, tips like these will reveal the information you need to know when it comes to treating peanut allergies. Lewis First, MD, is chief of pediatrics at the University of Vermont Children’s Hospital and Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Vermont’s Larner College of Medicine. You can also watch “First with Kids” weekly on WOKO 98.9FM.

Recently I have found parents shocked to ask me about peanut allergies.

Humorous puns aside, peanut allergies are serious, so let me give you some background on this topic.

How widespread is peanut allergy?

In the United States, about 2% of children are allergic to peanuts and half of them are also allergic to tree nuts such as almonds, walnuts, pecans, cashews, and sometimes even sunflower seeds. and sesame. In fact, peanut allergy is the leading cause of death related to food allergies in this country.

How to know if your child is affected

Usually the first signs after eating a peanut can be a runny nose, rash, or tingling on the tongue which can progress if left untreated to difficulty breathing, drop in blood pressure, and in turn loss of consciousness. We used to recommend not to try a peanut in a child until he was old enough to talk to us. But there is now more recent data suggesting that while there is no known family history of peanut allergy, exposure of infants to peanut products, such as a very thin layer of butter. peanut on a cracker when they are old enough to solidify, may reduce the risk of developing a peanut allergy as they age.

On the other hand, if there is a family history of severe peanut allergy or egg allergy eczema, then it is recommended that you consult your child’s doctor before introducing peanuts to them. Usually, a skin or blood test can determine if your child is at risk for peanut allergy.

Dealing with a diagnosis

If diagnosed, the best way to deal with this problem is to avoid the foods that trigger it. This requires not only educating a child and his or her family, but also friends, parents, caregivers and teachers. It also means checking food labels and informing restaurants of the allergy, to avoid accidental exposure.

If exposed, older children and adults with allergies to peanuts should take a prescribed dose of self-injecting epinephrine with them. The vaccine should also be available to teachers, school nurses and parents, especially if the child is too young to self-inject. After the injection is done, the child should be taken to an emergency center for continued observation and treatment, as this is a true medical emergency. A medical alert bracelet is also a good idea.

Hopefully, tips like these will reveal the information you need to deal with peanut allergies.

Lewis First, MD, is chief of pediatrics at the University of Vermont Children’s Hospital and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Vermont’s Larner College of Medicine. You can also watch “First with Kids” weekly on WOKO 98.9FM.


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