Millar says Wiggins’ AUT drugs should be banned

0
Image 1 of 5

Bradley Wiggins bids farewell to London

Bradley Wiggins bids farewell to London (Image credit: Tim de Waele / TDWSport.com)
Image 2 of 5

David Millar was at the start

David Millar was at the start (Image credit: Bettini Photo)
Image 3 of 5

David Millar was in attendance for Wiggins' record attempt.

David Millar was in attendance for Wiggins’ record attempt.
Image 4 of 5

Bradley Wiggins (Team WIGGINS) signing autographs for young fans

Bradley Wiggins (Team WIGGINS) signing autographs for young fans (Image credit: Tim de Waele / TDWSport.com)
Image 5 of 5

Sir Bradley Wiggins during stage 7a of the Tour of Britain

Sir Bradley Wiggins during stage 7a of the Tour of Britain (Image credit: Tim de Waele / TDWSport.com)

Former pro David Millar told the Telegraph this week that the Bradley Wiggins corticosteroid used with a therapeutic use release should be banned, and that he “could not imagine” that a doctor would prescribe it to a rider before competition.

Talk with the Telegraph In light of recent revelations about Wiggins’ use of the drug prior to the 2011 and 2012 Tours de France and prior to the 2013 Giro d’Italia, Millar said the corticosteroid was the “most potent” performance enhancing drug there was. he used in his own career. Millar, now retired and working as a cycling commentator, was suspended for two seasons from 2004 after admitting to using drugs.

The revelations about Wiggins’ TUEs, which also included the UCI-approved use of the asthma drugs salbutamol, formoterol and budesonide (from December 2008 to December 2009) were revealed in the “Fancy Bears” hack of the site World Anti-Doping Agency Web. Wiggins, who won the 2012 Tour de France, received six TUEs as he straddled Team Sky and other teams, according to medical records revealed in the Fancy Bear hack. Wiggins rode with Millar at Garmin in 2009.

“Like I said in my book [Racing Through The Dark], I took EPO and testosterone patches, and they obviously make huge differences in your blood, and you felt your best, ”Millar told the Telegraph. “… Kenacort [one of the commercial names for triamcinolone. Ed], however, was the only one you took and three days later you looked different.

“I remember that was one of the reasons I took sleeping pills because Kenacort put you on a weird plane. It’s pretty scary because it’s catabolic so it eats you up. C ‘was destructive. It was powerful. “

Millar declined to comment directly on Wiggins’ TUEs, according to the Telegrah report, but he said he “couldn’t imagine how bad it must be to have severe allergies and need them.”

Millar said that the drug, which can help with weight loss, undoubtedly improves performance.

“You would do all the training but my weight would stay,” he said. “But if I took Kenacort, 1.5-2 kg would drop in a week. And not only would the weight drop, I would feel stronger.

“If you do not have asthma and you take Ventolin, it will not give you any benefit. But if you take Kenacort, it will not only cure a sick person, it will make a sick person better than a person. healthy, a very gray area.

“I’m sure there are other forms of cortisone that could be used for allergies that aren’t that potent or don’t improve performance.

“We [athletes] shouldn’t have to deal with this. If it’s that strong, we shouldn’t be allowed to take it unless there is a serious problem, ”he told the Telegraph.

“And if we have such a serious problem, we shouldn’t run. I don’t know how a doctor could prescribe it. [before a race]. I can’t understand it. “

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.