Meeting dietary preferences is an essential part of the travel experience

Catering to food preferences and allergies is an essential part of the travel experience these days, no matter where in the world you go. At Lion Sands Ivory Lodge in the Sabi Sands Game Reserve in northeastern South Africa, a kitchen is locked away. It’s kosher, with two different sets of utensils for meat and dairy, and all prepared foods that meet Jewish dietary regulations. “It’s not a section of a kitchen that’s kosher,” said former lodge manager Andrew Temblett. “It’s actually a full satellite kitchen which is fully equipped.” CBS News correspondent Wendy Gillette secured a special rate to see the kitchen work with Timeless Africa Safaris, which caters to kosher customers. “We are a Jewish business, so the natural combination of pleasing and meeting all of our customers’ needs was an easy combination with an understanding of culture and religion and all the diversity it takes to be extremely kosher. light kosher.” says marketing manager Casey van Embden. Only about 5% of customers who book Timeless Africa Safaris are kosher, but about 95% have some sort of dietary request. A recent survey by Statista reveals that more than 4 in 10 Americans now follow a dietary rule. Other surveys show that figure as high as 6 in 10 Americans. Travel consultant Jim Bendt says travel was previously difficult for his family after his son Andrew was diagnosed with celiac disease 17 years ago. “Before, we had a suitcase and we filled it with gluten-free foods that you couldn’t buy in the market because they were just not available in packaged products. So we prepared all his food and traveled the world” he says. Bendt offers some advice for travelers with dietary needs: – Let the hotel know what you need in advance – Meet the chef if you’re in a remote location – Try to have the same server at meals. much easier to deal with travel and food preferences that are out there.” So all you need to digest is sight.

Catering to food preferences and allergies is an essential part of the travel experience these days, no matter where in the world you go.

At Lion Sands Ivory Lodge in the Sabi Sands Game Reserve in northeastern South Africa, a kitchen is locked away. It’s kosher, with two different sets of utensils for meat and dairy, and all prepared meals conforming to Jewish dietary rules.

“It’s not a section of a kitchen that’s kosher,” said former lodge manager Andrew Temblett. “It’s actually a full satellite kitchen which is fully equipped.”

CBS News correspondent Wendy Gillette secured a special rate to see the kitchen work with Timeless Africa Safaris, which caters to kosher customers. “We are a Jewish business, so the natural combination of pleasing and meeting all of our customers’ needs was an easy combination with an understanding of culture and religion and all the diversity it takes to be extremely kosher. light kosher.” says marketing manager Casey van Embden.

Only about 5% of customers who book Timeless Africa Safaris are kosher, but about 95% have some sort of dietary request.

A recent survey by Statista reveals that more than 4 in 10 Americans now follow a dietary rule. Other surveys show the figure as high as 6 in 10 Americans.

For travel consultant Jim Bendt, traveling was difficult for his family after his son Andrew was diagnosed with celiac disease 17 years ago. “Before, we had a suitcase and we filled it with gluten-free foods that you couldn’t buy in the market because they were just not available in packaged products. So we prepared all his food and traveled the world” he says. Bendt offers some tips for travelers with dietary needs:

– Inform the hotel in advance of your needs

– Meet the leader if you are in a remote location

– Try to have the same server at meals.

Bendt says, “Today it’s much easier to manage travel and food preferences.” So all you need to digest is sight.

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