Food Allergies – Parents Of Allergic Children http://parentsofallergicchildren.org/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 05:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-5.png Food Allergies – Parents Of Allergic Children http://parentsofallergicchildren.org/ 32 32 Breastfed babies are thought to suffer fewer allergies | Community News https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/breastfed-babies-are-thought-to-suffer-fewer-allergies-community-news/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/breastfed-babies-are-thought-to-suffer-fewer-allergies-community-news/ Breastfed babies are believed to suffer fewer allergic conditions, such as eczema and food allergies, than formula-fed babies; however, the reason has not been fully understood, according to a statement from the Penn State College of Medicine. “Now, a new study from Penn State College of Medicine reveals that small molecules found in most humans’ […]]]>

Breastfed babies are believed to suffer fewer allergic conditions, such as eczema and food allergies, than formula-fed babies; however, the reason has not been fully understood, according to a statement from the Penn State College of Medicine.

“Now, a new study from Penn State College of Medicine reveals that small molecules found in most humans’ breast milk may reduce the likelihood that infants will develop allergic conditions such as atopic dermatitis and food allergies,” says the press release.

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Navigating a food-centric vacation while including people with dietary limitations – The Lamron https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/navigating-a-food-centric-vacation-while-including-people-with-dietary-limitations-the-lamron/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/navigating-a-food-centric-vacation-while-including-people-with-dietary-limitations-the-lamron/ *Trigger warning: Mention of eating disorders and other medical conditions* If you’re hosting a Thanksgiving dinner, you’re probably thinking about what you’re going to serve, but maybe there’s someone in your life who has issues with food and you don’t want to rule them out. You want them to come celebrate, but you don’t know […]]]>

*Trigger warning: Mention of eating disorders and other medical conditions*

If you’re hosting a Thanksgiving dinner, you’re probably thinking about what you’re going to serve, but maybe there’s someone in your life who has issues with food and you don’t want to rule them out. You want them to come celebrate, but you don’t know how you can adequately include them. Dietary limitations can include anything from food allergies to gastrointestinal issues to eating disorders. Here are some suggestions on how to handle these types of situations. The solutions offered in this article may not work for everyone, but these suggestions come from someone with limited food intake due to health issues and from a place of good intentions.

The concept of someone eating little or nothing at the Thanksgiving dinner table is foreign to many, and there may be questions about how a situation like this should be handled. In a case similar to mine where there are foods that someone can’t eat, it’s important to contact that person directly when you invite them. Something that has worked in my family, for example, is for the host to contact the person with dietary restrictions and ask if there is any food they can provide that they might be fine eating.

When considering a case where someone has severe food allergies, it is again very important to contact the guest to see if there is anything they should not be serving at dinner. In a situation where someone has severe food allergies, it is important to consider the possibilities of cross-contamination and airborne food allergies.

You may encounter a situation where a person does not feel comfortable eating with others or attending a meal. You may want this person to come enjoy the festivities, but you don’t want to make them feel uncomfortable. My suggestion to this dilemma is to contact the person again and find a solution on a case-by-case basis. An example of a solution to a situation where someone is not comfortable attending a meal would be to tell the person what time dinner is and invite them over; but, if they are not comfortable with it, I suggest you find an arrangement and contact them after dinner is over so they can still come and enjoy the meeting. It’s a great way to make sure everyone is comfortable while enjoying the holidays and spending time with family and friends.

In a somewhat similar situation, where someone is uncomfortable eating or cannot eat during the gathering, it is important to reach out to them to see if there is a way to support them. Myself, as someone who has health issues limiting my diet, I enjoy attending meals. Mealtimes are a very social event in our society, so even if a person is uncomfortable eating or can’t eat, that doesn’t mean they don’t want to be included in the event. It can be strange to have someone sitting at your table not eating, but don’t force them to participate in the meal if it’s not something they can or want to do.

If you have a relatively small gathering at your meal, it may be important to communicate to other guests – with the permission of the person with a restriction – that someone will not eat or have limited consumption. If you are in a situation where you have a guest with a food allergy, it is crucial to communicate this to the other attendees, because often on Thanksgiving people bring dishes to contribute to the meal.

Another tip for accommodating people with dietary limitations is not to report a difference. Under no circumstances should a person with a restriction be forced to eat or feel bad about their situation. If a person is eating, you should never mention the amount of food on their plate, whether it’s what you perceive to be a little or a normal-sized meal. Do not mention the amount of food they consume. Comments like are you going to eat all this? can make people feel isolated and should never be talked about.

In all of these situations, communication is essential. The solutions in this article may not work for everyone, and I haven’t covered every possible scenario. The best thing you can do to properly accommodate someone is to reach out and ask how you can support them. Just because it’s a typical food-centric holiday doesn’t mean people with dietary restrictions or limited intake don’t want to join in the fun. If nothing else, use your common sense and source of compassion when dealing with these situations.

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Crustless pie a treat for those with gluten intolerance | Food https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/crustless-pie-a-treat-for-those-with-gluten-intolerance-food/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 05:15:00 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/crustless-pie-a-treat-for-those-with-gluten-intolerance-food/ People with food allergies or intolerances may avoid certain celebrations for fear that a nibble of this or a bite of that might trigger an allergic reaction. In such cases, concern for ingredients can cast a pall over normally festive occasions. People with celiac disease or gluten intolerances need to be careful about the foods […]]]>

People with food allergies or intolerances may avoid certain celebrations for fear that a nibble of this or a bite of that might trigger an allergic reaction. In such cases, concern for ingredients can cast a pall over normally festive occasions.

People with celiac disease or gluten intolerances need to be careful about the foods they eat. Meals or desserts containing gluten, a protein found in grains such as wheat, semolina, rye, barley, spelled, flour, etc., can trigger intestinal upset and other symptoms. With delicious pies, cakes and cookies on the holiday serving table, gluten is likely to make an appearance. However, with careful planning, people who can’t digest gluten-containing foods can still indulge in their favorite holiday flavors.

Cooking time

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Jim Shulman: How did we become so similar to our parents? | Story https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/jim-shulman-how-did-we-become-so-similar-to-our-parents-story/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 17:37:00 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/jim-shulman-how-did-we-become-so-similar-to-our-parents-story/ In the baby boom era, drinking filtered or bottled water was unheard of; if someone was thirsty while playing outside, they drank the water from the garden hose. PHOTO PROVIDED BY JIM SHULMAN When I played Bob Dylan’s first album in 1963, my parents frowned and shouted, “You call that music? When we were your […]]]>







A shirtless child drinks from a pipe

In the baby boom era, drinking filtered or bottled water was unheard of; if someone was thirsty while playing outside, they drank the water from the garden hose.




When I played Bob Dylan’s first album in 1963, my parents frowned and shouted, “You call that music? When we were your age, we made great music with big bands and crooners. You have no taste!

While my younger sisters preferred the Beatles, then harder rock bands, our parents’ criticism of musical choices continued.

I can’t tell you how many times our parents told us that we had so much more stuff and experiences than they ever had. Yet they would brag about their childhood. In the 1960s, my parents were out of touch with the music, hairstyles, clothing choices and more of my baby boomer generation.

They simply did not appreciate or accept the changing times. My friends and I were definitely hip and our people were just square. They were too set in their ways and too old-fashioned to keep up with the changing times. It was a “generation gap”.

Twenty years ago, when my nephews rejoiced to see my reaction to rapping with swear words. My first thought was, “How can they call this music?” At their age, we had the best of 60s music! It has now been over 60 years since I was a teenager, and I can’t deny that I react to changing times just like my parents.

It’s so obvious when young kids show me features on my cell phone and I tell them I’m never going to use those things. I avoid going beyond Facebook on the Internet. I am disconnected from Snapchat, Twitter, TikTok, Instagram, WhatsApp or any other form of social network. I’m really no different than my parents who struggled with technology and who I couldn’t convince to use a personal computer about 25 years ago.







Dylan-Catalogue-Sale (copy)

Singer and songwriter Bob Dylan performs in November 1963, the year after the release of his first album. His songs spoke to a generation – which now seems far removed from recent generations.




I still can’t easily program the thermostats for our zone heating system. I don’t know how to find all the features of our four year old car. I fumble around using my laptop to see a QR code or pay for restaurant tabs. I ignore texts and most calls too.

When I meet older baby boomer friends, we all share our same frustrating experiences. After finishing a litany of our aches, pains, surgeries and the like, we inevitably talk about how sweet children and grandchildren are these days. Just like our parents, we strive to understand how our offspring are so much more spoiled than our generation.

While we may not have thought our childhoods were peachy back then, there are now few of us baby boomers who would deny that we grew up at the best of times.

When we were kids, most of us lived in neighborhoods where we rarely locked doors. We had friends visiting or visiting without arranged play dates. Some of us walked into friends’ homes without knocking. Drinking filtered or bottled water was unheard of and especially if we got thirsty while playing outside we drank water from the garden hose.

In our backyards or parks, we played football, hardball baseball, and rode bikes without hard hats or other safety gear. On Halloween in second or third grade, most of us went out alone and never worried about predators, eating homemade treats, or having dangerous items in treats that required X-ray inspection.

When it comes to leisure, fancy sneakers did not exist. Our sport-specific attire was minimal and usually only found in organized team sports. As kids, most of us never heard of sports like soccer, field hockey, lacrosse, squash, or pickleball. We’ve played king on the mountain, tag, red rover, dodgeball, and dozens of other unsupervised games that are now considered dangerous or risky.

Sure, we often had our share of fights with peers, but rarely during our high school years, and no one used guns and knives. Swimming in outdoor pools was foreign to most of us. None of our friends had more than children’s wading pools in their backyards. In the summer we swam in lakes or pools. We walked or cycled everywhere and even when it was dark.

When we went to school or “in the street” a few kilometers from home, we took the bus. Taking a ride in the family car was more often a treat. Taxis were rarely used and Uber was not an option. I remember hitchhiking when I was a teenager and I was never too scared.

When it comes to health issues, all of the children have received inoculations like the polio vaccine without the politicized challenges we’ve seen with COVID. We’ve had our share of wounds, scrapes, splinters and cuts that have been treated with remedies like Mercurochrome or pungent iodine.

Trips to hospital for injuries were very rare. As toddlers we got bitter cod liver oil or ADC drops for healthy growth and not sugary gummy vitamins. Food allergies, lactose intolerance and gluten-free diets were unheard of back then.

Speaking of health, we have been exposed to asbestos, lead paint and all sorts of now taboo chemicals. In the summer, we hunted the “bug man” who ran through the fog of poisonous DDT which he sprayed to kill mosquitoes. If necessary, schools gave us aspirin or first aid without parental consent and for fear of prosecution.

Health education was little more than a description of basic food groups. We didn’t have any sex education classes, at least us boys. There were no condom lessons as they approached adolescence, and very few teenage girls had to deal with unplanned pregnancies.

In college, if reproduction was taught in science classes, it was presented about fish or other species and no mention of their anatomical parts. The peer group discussion was our introduction to sex and was often presented in a distorted way or via jokes.

I remember making plastic models out of airplane “dope”, but I had no desire to sniff it to get high. Medicines were to be taken only in case of illness. After all, we were told that drugs were evil, that they would eventually turn you into a heroin addict and that you would die young. Even younger baby boomers who experimented with the drug rarely used needles or became addicted. And ADD or ADHD being treated with stimulants while parents were on antidepressants or tranquilizers was every bit as foreign as the concept of dysfunctional families that could require weeks or even years of medication and therapy.

Yes, we had toys, mostly given for birthdays, Christmas or Hanukkah. Other times the toys were small and came from five and ten cent stores. Electronic toys like Xboxes were years away from being invented. We thought any toy with batteries or using a plug was pretty cool, but we rarely have them.

Despite our challenges growing up, we had a great time as baby boomers. Our parents thought we had a much sweeter life than them and we don’t really enjoy life experiences like them. It’s funny how we feel that now about younger generations and resist in many of their ways.

It is an inevitable part of maturation that we have become our parents and that we regard the younger generations as our parents made ours. Time will tell if these young people will see their youth as we see ours and fight change, but I’ll bet on it.

Despite my parents’ views on Bob Dylan, he was right when he sang:

Your old road is receding fast

Please get out of the new

If you can’t reach out

For the times they change

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The FAA has asked for comment on the small airplane seats. Will they grow? https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/the-faa-has-asked-for-comment-on-the-small-airplane-seats-will-they-grow/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 21:05:00 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/the-faa-has-asked-for-comment-on-the-small-airplane-seats-will-they-grow/ Comment this story Comment ” Cramped “. “Unsafe.” “Torture.” Many of the more than 26,000 airline seat size reviews submitted to the Federal Aviation Administration during its recent public comment periodwhich closed last week, paints a grim picture of the passenger experience on the country’s biggest airlines. The FAA will now sift through those comments […]]]>

Comment

” Cramped “. “Unsafe.” “Torture.”

Many of the more than 26,000 airline seat size reviews submitted to the Federal Aviation Administration during its recent public comment periodwhich closed last week, paints a grim picture of the passenger experience on the country’s biggest airlines.

The FAA will now sift through those comments and decide whether or not to issue a rule on minimum seat dimensions. But even if you find the economy seats uncomfortable, this review isn’t about luxury; the FAA assesses seat size for passenger safety during emergency evacuations.

“We will review all applicable comments. Our review has no set timeframe,” an agency spokesperson told The Washington Post in an email Monday.

Will we see bigger seats on airplanes in the near future? Here’s what to expect.

Americans are bigger. Should the FAA stop airplane seats from shrinking?

What prompted the FAA review?

Airlines have pushed back on calls from consumer advocates and members of Congress to widen their seats, arguing that the seats are wide enough and far enough apart to allow for quick emergency evacuation, which the FAA says is the main due to seat size revision.

Congress passed the Air Transport Seat Evacuation Actor SEAT Act, as part of the FAA’s reauthorization bill that was signed into law in 2018, requiring the agency to issue regulations on minimum seating requirements “necessary for the safety of passengers.”

In response, the agency conducted mock emergency evacuations and reviewed past incidents involving evacuations, of which none found a need to increase the size of the seats.

“The FAA has conducted and continues to conduct extensive reviews and research of evacuation standards, and there is no factual or data predicate to promulgate additional rules regarding aircraft seat dimensions” , wrote two industry trade groups for airlines, Airlines for America and International. Air Transport Association, in their public comment.

Consumer group urges FAA to stop shrinking airplane seats

These simulated emergency evacuations have been criticized for relying on healthy participants under the age of 60 and not simulating the actual conditions of an emergency, such as cabin smoke and passengers trying to grab their hand luggage. The transport department Inspector General’s Office noted in 2020 that these simulations often do not account for tight seating on many airlines.

In an October 27 letter at the FAA, 25 members of Congress called the evacuation study “deeply flawed” and urged the agency to analyze the impact of seat sizes on “all demographic groups not represented” in the study.

The FAA wrote in a march letter to members of Congress that his studies should be conducted in accordance with “regulatory and ethical standards for human testing”, and acknowledged that the studies “provide useful information, but not necessarily definitive”.

The agency said the public comment period – which ran from August to November 1 – would allow it to better assess the impacts on all passengers, including “children, people over 60 and disabled people”.

Henry Harteveldt, travel analyst at Atmosphere Research Group, said the FAA is likely to “throw this decision down the road” amid intense pressure from the airline industry.

“Airlines don’t want the FAA or any government agency telling them how to run their business,” Harteveldt said. Airlines will likely argue that minimum seat requirements will drive higher fares for customers and set back their sustainability efforts because more seats mean less carbon output per passenger, he said. .

What does “first class” mean?

Harteveldt predicted that, at most, the FAA will set a floor for legroom “where the low-cost airlines currently are,” such as Spirit, Frontier and Allegiant.

Since FAA regulators focus exclusively on safety rather than passenger comfort, major regulatory action should be the result of a safety study indicating that narrow seats are too difficult to evacuate, Harteveldt said. .

He said the FAA needed to redo its evacuation tests with the legroom and seat width offered on low-cost airlines, a completely full cabin, carry-on baggage and a diverse set of passengers, including new travellers, seniors, people with disabilities and travelers who do not speak English.

“Unless the FAA does a really thorough, really objective set of safety-related evacuation studies and bases its conclusion on that, it has no reason to make any decisions,” Harteveldt said.

William J. McGee, senior aviation researcher at the American Economic Liberties Project, said the tightness of modern aircraft seats is a “life-and-death safety issue.”.”

“The FAA has done a very poor job in recent years overseeing emergency evacuation testing,” he said. “Obviously that goes hand in hand with the issue of tighter seats.”

You should practice for your next long flight. Here’s how.

In public comment at the FAA, McGee and other consumer advocates also argued that narrow seats pose a health risk, due to the likelihood of deep vein thrombosis or exposure to food allergies from other passengers.

“We argued that health is a safety issue,” and therefore under the responsibility of FAA review, McGee said.

Can the FAA force airlines to expand seats?

Outside of FAA regulations, there are few ways to force airlines to increase their seat sizes, Harteveldt said. The FAA’s parent agency, the Department of Transportation, has largely avoided regulating airline business matters since deregulation in 1978, he said.

The only other mechanism by which the seats could expand is through the advancement of seat and aircraft construction. Airlines for America said in a statement that its member airlines, which include most major U.S. carriers, “continue to invest in a wide range of innovative technologies to maximize personal space in the cabin.”

Airbus recently announcement a design change to its A350 aircraft that would reduce the thickness of its interior walls, allowing each seat to be 0.7 inches wider in a typical nine-in-a-row configuration, according to Reuters. However, airlines could also choose to use the extra space for a 10th seat in the row, which would result in all seats being 1 inch narrower.

The rules of flight like a decent human

“The days when you could relax comfortably in an economy class seat that was wide enough to be comfortable and had enough leg room are long gone,” Harteveldt said.

McGee recommended that travelers choosing a seat search for their flight on seat guruwhich provides information on seat pitch (legroom) and width, as well as reviews of individual seats by other passengers.

McGee said he was optimistic the recent review would “move the needle at the FAA,” but warned that the agency failing to take action now could allow carriers to make their seats even smaller.

“If it doesn’t, the airlines will take it as carte blanche to do whatever they want with the seats,” he said. “And if you think it’s bad now, it’s only going to get worse.”

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Your review: Halloween show https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/your-review-halloween-show/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 10:21:57 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/your-review-halloween-show/ Nelson Otto, City of Jefferson Dear Editor, I have noticed in the past and really noticed this year the number of Trunk or Treats. I would like to suggest something new for Halloween. A Spooktacular Halloween celebration on Halloween night in downtown Jefferson City. Beginning at sundown, most organizations that have chests or goodies would […]]]>

Nelson Otto, City of Jefferson

Dear Editor,

I have noticed in the past and really noticed this year the number of Trunk or Treats. I would like to suggest something new for Halloween. A Spooktacular Halloween celebration on Halloween night in downtown Jefferson City.

Beginning at sundown, most organizations that have chests or goodies would be invited to meet in downtown Jefferson City. Different organizations could set up kiosks or tents along the streets to distribute candy and make it more inclusive. Companies like Scholastic, etc., would be asked to donate books, toys and gift certificates for children with food allergies.

These cabins would be marked with purple pumpkins.

The Governor’s Mansion would open for tours and a non-spooky Halloween. Street lamps would be transformed into glowing pumpkins. Flowerbeds and hanging pots with fall colored plants and brightly colored leaves.

The jail could be open for Halloween night tours and a trolley would transport visitors from the main downtown area to and from the jail and parking lots. The McRaven Ballroom Flash mob could be invited to perform. Bringing together the efforts of many groups in a joint extravaganza that would draw attention and people from across central Missouri.

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DBV TECHNOLOGIES SA Management Report and Analysis of Financial Condition and Operating Results (Form 10-Q) https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/dbv-technologies-sa-management-report-and-analysis-of-financial-condition-and-operating-results-form-10-q/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 21:34:10 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/dbv-technologies-sa-management-report-and-analysis-of-financial-condition-and-operating-results-form-10-q/ You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations in conjunction with our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and related notes included in Part 1, Item 1 of this Report and with our audited financial statements and related notes thereto for the year ended December 31, 2021, included […]]]>
You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition
and results of operations in conjunction with our unaudited condensed
consolidated financial statements and related notes included in Part 1, Item 1
of this Report and with our audited financial statements and related notes
thereto for the year ended December 31, 2021, included in our Annual Report on
Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2021, filed with the Securities and
Exchange Commission on March 9, 2022, or the Annual Report. This discussion and
other parts of this Report contain forward-looking statements that involve risks
and uncertainties, such as statements of our plans, objectives, expectations and
intentions. Our actual results could differ materially from those discussed in
these forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause such differences are
discussed in the section of this Report titled "Special Note Regarding
Forward-Looking Statements" and under "Item 1A. Risk Factors" in the Annual
Report.

Insight


We are a clinical-stage specialty biopharmaceutical company focused on changing
the field of immunotherapy by developing a novel technology platform called
Viaskin. Our therapeutic approach is based on epicutaneous immunotherapy, or
EPIT
TM
, our proprietary method of delivering biologically active compounds to the
immune system through intact skin using Viaskin. We have generated significant
data demonstrating that Viaskin's mechanism of action is novel and
differentiated, as it targets specific antigen-presenting immune cells in the
skin, called Langerhans cells, that capture the antigen and migrate to the lymph
node in order to activate the immune system without passage of the antigen into
the bloodstream, minimizing systemic exposure in the body. We are advancing this
unique technology to treat patients, including infants and children, suffering
from food allergies, for whom safety is paramount, since the introduction of the
offending allergen into their bloodstream can cause severe or life-threatening
allergic reactions, such as anaphylactic shock. We believe Viaskin may offer
convenient, self-administered, non-invasive immunotherapy to patients. Our most
advanced clinical program is Viaskin Peanut.

Viaskin

MT

Peanut for children from 4 to 11 years old United States


In January 2021, the Company received written responses from the FDA to
questions provided in the Type A meeting request the Company submitted in
October 2020 following the Complete Response Letter received in August 2020. The
FDA agreed with its position that a modified Viaskin Peanut patch should not be
considered as a new product entity provided the occlusion chamber of the current
Viaskin Peanut patch and the peanut protein dose of 250 µg (approximately 1/1000
of one peanut) remains unchanged and performs in the same way it has performed
previously. In order to confirm the consistency of efficacy data between the
existing and a modified patch, FDA requested an assessment comparing the uptake
of allergen (peanut protein) between the patches in peanut allergic children
ages 4-11. The Company named that assessment EQUAL, which stands for Equivalence
in Uptake of ALlergen. The FDA also recommended conducting a 6-month,
well-controlled safety and adhesion trial to assess a modified Viaskin Peanut
patch in the intended patient population. The Company later named this study
STAMP, which stands for Safety, Tolerability, and Adhesion of Modified Patches

Based on January 2021 In response to the FDA, the Company has defined three parallel lines of work:

  1. Identify a modified Viaskin patch ("mVP").


2. Generate the 6-month clinical safety and adherence data requested by the FDA via

STAMP, which the company expected to be the longest component of the mVP

clinical project. The Company has given priority to the submission of the STAMP protocol in order to

         the Company could begin the study as soon as possible.



    3.   Demonstrate the equivalence in allergen uptake between the current and
         modified patches in the intended patient population via EQUAL. The
         complexity of EQUAL hinged on the lack of established clinical and

regulatory criteria for characterizing the uptake of allergens via the epicutaneous route

patch. To support these exchanges, the Company presented its proposal

         approach to demonstrate allergen uptake equivalence between the two
         patches, and allotted time to generate informative data through two
         additional studies:


a. PREQUAL, a phase I study with healthy adult volunteers to optimize the

            allergen sample collection methodologies and validate the assays the
            Company intends to use in EQUAL



        b.  'EQUAL in adults'-a second Phase I study with adult healthy volunteers
            to compare the allergen uptake of cVP and mVP;


In March 2021, the Company commenced CHAMP (Comparison of adHesion Among
Modified Patches), a trial in healthy adult volunteers to evaluate the adhesion
of five modified Viaskin Peanut patches, to identify the one or two
best-performing patches, which the Company completed in the second quarter of
2021. Based on the adhesion parameters studied, the Company selected the
modified patch to advance to

                                       21

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Contents


further clinical testing in the intended patient population. All modified
Viaskin Peanut patches demonstrated better adhesion performance as compared to
the then-current Viaskin Peanut patch, and the Company then selected two
modified patches that performed best out of the five modified patches studied
for further development. The Company then selected the circular patch for
further development, which is larger in size relative to the current patch and
circular in shape.

In May 2021, the Company submitted its proposed STAMP protocol to the FDA, and
in October 2021, the Company received an Advice/Information Request letter from
the FDA. In this letter, the FDA requested a stepwise approach to the modified
Viaskin patch development program and provided partial feedback on the STAMP
protocol. Specifically, the FDA requested that the Company conduct allergen
uptake comparison studies (i.e., 'EQUAL in Adults', EQUAL), and submit the
allergen uptake comparison data for FDA review and feedback prior to starting
the STAMP study.

After careful review of the FDA's information requests, in December 2021, the
Company decided not to pursue the stepwise approach to the development plans for
Viaskin Peanut as requested by the FDA in the October 2021 letter. The Company
estimated that the FDA's newly proposed stepwise approach would require at least
five rounds of exchanges that necessitate FDA alignment prior to initiating
STAMP, the 6-month safety and adhesion study. As such, in December 2021, the
Company announced its plan to initiate a pivotal Phase III placebo-controlled
efficacy trial for a modified Viaskin Peanut patch (mVP) in children in the
intended patient population. The clinical trial will also include updates to the
Instructions for Use (IFU). The Company considers this approach the most
straightforward to potentially demonstrate effectiveness, safety, and improved
in vivo adhesion of the modified Viaskin Peanut system. The FDA confirmed the
Company's change in strategy is agreeable via oral and written exchanges.

The new pivotal Phase 3 study on modified Viaskin Peanut has been named VITESSE (Viaskin Peanut Immunotherapy Trial to Evaluate Safety, Simplicity and Efficacy).


In May 2022, the Company announced that the FDA granted it a Type C meeting to
align on the protocol and the study protocol was submitted to the FDA as part of
the Type C meeting briefing package.

On September 9, 2022, the Company announced the initiation of the Phase 3 study,
using the modified Viaskin™ Peanut Patch, in peanut-allergic children ages 4 to
7 years.

On September 21, 2022, the Company announced it received feedback from the U.S.
FDA in the form of a partial clinical hold on its VITESSE Phase 3 clinical
study. In the partial clinical hold letter, the FDA specifies changes to
elements of the VITESSE protocol with the intent for the trial to support a
future BLA submission. The modifications noted within the FDA's communication
address design elements, including the statistical analysis of adhesion, minimum
daily wear time and technical alignments in methods of categorizing data, to
meet study objectives as well as the total number of trial participants on
active treatment. The Company has not yet begun the screening or recruitment of
subjects in the VITESSE study. The partial clinical hold is specific to VITESSE
and does not impact any other ongoing its clinical studies. The Company expects
to provide additional updates following consultation with the FDA.

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Contents

Viaskin Peanut for children 4 to 11 years old – History and current status of European Union regulations


In August 2021, the Company announced its receipt from the EMA of the Day 180
list of outstanding issues, which is an established part of the prescribed EMA
review process. It is a letter that is meant to include any remaining questions
or objections at that stage in the process. The EMA indicated many of their
objections and major objections from the Day 120 list of questions had been
answered. One major objection remained at Day 180. The Major Objection
questioned the limitations of the data, for example, the clinical relevance and
effect size supported by a single pivotal study.

In December 2021, the Company announced it had withdrawn the Marketing
Authorization Application for Viaskin Peanut and formally notified the EMA of
our decision. The initial filing was supported by positive data from a single,
placebo-controlled Phase 3 pivotal trial known as PEPITES (V712-301). The
decision to withdraw was based on the view of EMA Committee for Medicinal
Products for Human Use (CHMP) that the data available to date from a single
pivotal study were not sufficient to preclude a Major Objection at Day 180 in
the review cycle. The Company believes data from a second Viaskin Peanut pivotal
study will support a more robust path for licensure of Viaskin Peanut in the EU.
The Company intends to resubmit the MAA when that data set is available.

Viaskin Peanut for children from 1 to 3 years old


In June 2020, the Company announced that in Part A, patients in both treatment
arms showed consistent treatment effects after 12 months of therapy, as assessed
by a double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge and biomarker results. Part
A subjects were not included in Part B and the efficacy analyses from Part A
were not statistically powered to demonstrate superiority of either dose versus
placebo. These results validate the ongoing investigation of the 250 Pg dose in
this age group, which is the dose being studied in Part B of the study.
Enrollment for Part B of EPITOPE was completed in the first quarter of 2022.

In June 2022, The Company announced that its pivotal Phase III trial EPITOPE,
assessing the safety and efficacy of Viaskin™ Peanut 250 µg for the treatment of
peanut-allergic toddlers ages 1 to 3 years, met its primary endpoint. Viaskin
Peanut demonstrated a statistically significant treatment effect (p<0.001), with
67.0% of subjects in the Viaskin Peanut arm meeting the treatment responder
criteria after 12 months, as compared to 33.5% of subjects in the placebo arm
(difference in response rates = 33.4 %, 95 % CI = 22.4% - 44.5 %).

DBV intends to further analyze the EPITOPE data and explore regulatory pathways for Viaskin Peanut in children aged 1-3 years given the high unmet need and lack of treatments approved for this vulnerable population.

Critical Accounting Policies and Significant Judgments and Estimates


Our management's discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results
of operations is based on our condensed consolidated financial statements, which
have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles
in the United States, or U.S. GAAP. The preparation of these condensed
consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions
that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of
contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the condensed consolidated
financial statements, as well as the revenue, costs and expenses recognized
during the reporting periods. Our estimates are based on our historical
experience and on various other factors that we believe are reasonable under the
circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about
the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from
other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different
assumptions or conditions.

There have been no new policies or significant changes to our critical
accounting policies as disclosed in the critical accounting policies described
in the Annual Report. Our significant accounting policies are more fully
described in Note 1 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements in
Part I, Item 1 of our Annual Report.

Business trends and operating results

Comparison of the three months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021

The following table summarizes our results of operations, derived from our condensed consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with WE GAAP and presented in thousands of WE Dollars, for the three months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021.

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  Table of Contents

                                               Three months ended
                                                  September 30,
                                              2022            2021           $ change        % change
Operating income                            $   2,074       $   1,323              751              57 %

Operating expenses
Research and development expenses             (15,096 )       (16,320 )          1,224              (8 %)
Sales and marketing expenses                     (159 )        (1,072 )            913             (85 %)
General and administrative expenses            (4,839 )        (8,299 )          3,460             (42 %)

Total Operating expenses                      (20,094 )       (25,691 )          5,597             (22 %)

Financial income                                  732             336              396             118 %

Income tax                                         -               -                -               -

Net loss                                    $ (17,287 )     $ (24,033 )          6,745             (28 %)

Basic/diluted Net loss per share
attributable to shareholders                $   (0.18 )     $   (0.44 )


Operating Income

The following table summarizes our operating profit for the three months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021:

                           Three months ended
                              September 30,
                            2022          2021         $ change        % change
Sales                            -            -               -               -
Other income                  2,074        1,323             751              57 %
Research tax credit           1,407        1,647            (240 )           (15 %)
Other operating income          668         (324 )           992            (306 %)

Total operating income        2,074        1,323             751              57 %



Our operating income is primarily generated from the French research tax credit
(
Crédit d'Iimpôt Recherche
, or "CIR"), and by the revenue recognized under our collaboration agreement
with Nestlé Health Science. We generated operating income of $2.1 million during
the three months ended September 30, 2022 compared to $ 1.3 million during the
three months ended September 30, 2021. The increase in operating income is
primarily attributable to the revenue recognized under the Nestlé's
collaboration agreement, as we updated the measurement of progress of the Phase
II clinical trial conducted as part of the agreement. During the three months
ended September 30, 2021 negative revenue was recognized under the Nestlé's
collaboration agreement due to delays in new patient enrollment. The decrease in
research tax credit is attributable to the decrease in eligible costs in
connection with Research and Development costs.

Research and development costs

The following table summarizes our research and development expenses incurred during the three months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021:


                                                 Three Months Ended
                                                   September 30,
Research and Development expenses                2022           2021        $ change        % change
External clinical-related expenses                11,136         8,633          2,503              29 %
Employee-related costs                             2,648         3,228           (581 )           (18 %)
Share-based payment expenses                         538           933           (395 )           (42 %)
Depreciation, amortization and other costs           774         3,526         (2,752 )           (78 %)

Total Research and Development expenses           15,096        16,320         (1,224 )            (8 %)



Research and Development costs fell by $1.2 million for the three months ended September 30, 2022compared to the three

                                       24

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Contents


months ended September 30, 2021, primarily due to a decrease in depreciation,
amortization and following the loss at completion recorded on the Phase II
clinical trial conducted as part of the Nestlé agreement for the three months
ended September 30, 2021. The increase in external clinical-related expenses is
driven by the launch of work on VITESSE protocol. We have also continued to
practice financial discipline and implemented further cost containment
strategies.

Employee-related costs, excluding share-based payment expenses, decreased by
$1.0 million for the three months ended September 30, 2022 compared to the three
months ended September 30, 2021 mostly due to EUR/USD exchange variation and
workforce reduction.

                                       25

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Sales and marketing expenses

The following table summarizes our sales and marketing expenses incurred during the three months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021:


                                                Three Months Ended
                                                  September 30,
Sales and Marketing expenses                   2022            2021          $ change        % change
Personnel expenses                                138             492             (354 )           (72 %)
External professional services and other
costs                                              20             580             (559 )           (96 %)

Total Sales and Marketing expenses                159           1,072             (913 )           (85 %)



Sales and marketing expenses amounted to $0.2 million for the three months ended
September 30, 2022compared to $1.1 million for the three months ended
September 30, 2021.

Staff costs decreased by $0.3 million for the three months ended
September 30, 2022compared to the three months ended September 30, 2021 due to the reduction in staff following the full implementation of the new organization.

General and administrative expenses

The following table summarizes our general and administrative expenses incurred during the three months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021:


                                                 Three Months Ended
                                                   September 30,
General and Administrative expenses              2022           2021        $ change       % change
External professional services                     1,292         2,216           (924 )          (42 %)
Employee-related costs                             1,110         2,052           (942 )          (46 %)
Share-based payment expenses                         488           530            (42 )           (8 %)

Depreciation and other charges 1,949 3,501

(1,552) (44%)

Total general and administrative expenses 4,839 8,299

(3,460) (42%)




General and Administrative expenses decreased by $3.5 million for the three
months ended September 30, 2022, compared to the three months ended
September 30, 2021 primarily due to a decrease in depreciation, amortization and
other costs as we continued to practice financial discipline and implemented
further cost containment strategies.

Financial income (expenses)


Our financial income was approximately $0.7 million for the three months ended
September 30, 2022, compared to a financial income of $0.3 million for the three
months ended September 30, 2021. This item mainly includes foreign exchange
income.

Income tax

We recorded no profit or income tax expense for the three months ended
September 30, 2022 or 2021.

Net loss


Net loss was $17.3 million for the three months ended September 30, 2022,
compared to $24.0 million for the three months ended September 30, 2021. Net
loss per share (based on the weighted average number of shares outstanding over
the period) was $0.18 and $0.44 for the three months ended September 30, 2022
and 2021, respectively.

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Contents

Business trends and operating results

Comparison of the nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021

The following table summarizes our results of operations, derived from our condensed consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with WE GAAP and presented in thousands of WE Dollars, for the nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021.

                                                 Nine months ended
                                                   September 30,
                                               2022            2021          $ change         % change
Operating income                             $   6,148       $   2,776           3,373              122 %

Operating expenses
Research and development expenses              (45,930 )       (58,663 )        12,733              (22 )%
Sales and marketing expenses                    (1,659 )        (2,999 )         1,340              (45 )%
General and administrative expenses            (17,173 )       (26,250 )         9,077              (35 )%

Total Operating expenses                       (64,762 )       (87,912 )        23,150              (26 )%

Financial income                                 1,668             597           1,071              179 %

Income tax (expense)                               (87 )           404            (491 )           (122 )%

Net loss                                     $ (57,033 )     $ (84,136 )        27,103              (32 )%

Basic/diluted Net loss per share
attributable to shareholders                 $   (0.79 )     $   (1.53 )


Operating Income

The following table summarizes our operating profit for the nine months ended
September 30, 2022 and 2021:

                           Nine months ended
                             September 30,
                           2022          2021         $ change        % change
Sales                           -            -
Other income                 6,148        2,776           3,373             122 %
Research tax credit          4,467        5,324            (857 )           (16 %)
Other operating income       1,681       (2,549 )         4,230            (166 %)

Total operating income       6,148        2,776           3,373             122 %



Our operating income was primarily generated from the French research tax credit
(
Crédit d'Impôt Recherche
or "CIR") and from revenue recognized under our collaboration agreement with
Nestlé Health Science. We generated operating income of $6.1 million during the
nine months ended September 30, 2022, compared to $2.8 million during the nine
months ended September 30, 2021.

The increase in operating income is primarily attributable to the revenue
recognized under the Nestlé's collaboration agreement, as we updated the
measurement of progress of the Phase II clinical trial conducted as part of the
agreement. During the nine months ended September 30, 2021 negative revenue was
recognized under the Nestlé's collaboration agreement due to delays in new
patient enrollment. The decrease in research tax credit is attributable to the
decline in eligible expenses in connection with Research and Development costs.

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Research and development costs

The following table summarizes our research and development expenses incurred during the nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021:


                                                 Nine Months Ended
                                                   September 30,
                                                2022           2021        $ change        % change
Research and Development expenses
External clinical-related expenses               30,150        31,319         (1,169 )            (4 %)
Employee-related costs                            7,761        10,525         (2,764 )           (26 %)
Share-based payment expenses                      1,596         1,747           (151 )            (9 %)

Depreciation and other charges 6,423 15,072

   (8,649 )           (57 %)

Total search and Development costs 45,930 58,663

  (12,733 )           (22 %)



Research and Development expenses decreased by $12.7 million for the nine months
ended September 30, 2022 compared to the nine months ended September 30, 2021
primarily due to a decrease in external clinical-related expenses as main
component of the work on clinical studies such as REALISE and EPITOPE has been
finalized during the year 2021. We have also continued to practice financial
discipline and implemented further cost containment strategies.

Employee-related costs, excluding share-based payments expenses, decreased by
$2.8 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2022, compared to the nine
months ended September 30, 2021 due to the workforce reduction following full
implementation of the new organization.

The decrease in depreciation, amortization and other costs was primarily due to
the loss at completion recorded on the Phase II clinical trial conducted as part
of Nestlé agreement.

Sales and Marketing expenses

The following table summarizes our sales and marketing expenses incurred during the nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021:

                                                     Nine Months Ended
                                                       September 30,
                                                     2022          2021        $ change        % change
Sales and Marketing expenses
Personnel expenses                                       727        1,528           (801 )           (52 %)
External professional services and other costs           932        1,471           (538 )           (37 %)

Total Sales and Marketing expenses                     1,659        2,999         (1,340 )           (45 %)



Sales and marketing expenses decreased by $1.3 million for the nine months ended
September 30, 2022compared to the nine months ended September 30, 2021mainly due to a decrease in personnel costs.

Personnel costs, down by $0.8 million for the nine months ended
September 30, 2022compared to the nine months ended September 30, 2021 due to the reduction in staff following the full implementation of the new organization.

General and administrative expenses

The following table summarizes our general and administrative expenses incurred during the nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021:


                                                 Nine Months Ended
                                                   September 30,
                                                2022           2021        $ change        % change
General and Administrative expenses
External professional services                    4,171         6,425         (2,255 )           (35 %)
Employee-related costs                            5,139         7,263         (2,124 )           (29 %)
Share-based payment expenses                      1,822         2,084           (263 )           (13 %)

Depreciation and other charges 6,042 10,478

   (4,436 )           (42 %)

Total general and administrative expenses 17,173 26,250

  (9,077 )           (35 %)




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General and Administrative expenses decreased by $9.1 million for the nine
months ended September 30, 2022, compared to the nine months ended September 30,
2021, primarily due to a decrease of depreciation, amortization and other costs.
We have continued to practice financial discipline and implemented further cost
containment strategies.

The decrease in employee-related costs, excluding share-based payment expenses,
is directly related to the workforce reduction following full implementation of
the new organization
.

Financial income (expense)

Our financial income was $1.7 million for the nine months ended September 30,
2022, compared to a financial income of $0.6 million for the nine months ended
September 30, 2021. This item mainly includes foreign exchange income (expense).

Income tax


Our income tax expense was $87,000 for the nine months ended September 30, 2022,
compared to a US Tax income of $404,000 for the nine months ended September 30,
2021.

Net loss

Net loss was $57.0 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2022,
compared to $84.1 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021. Net loss
per share (based on the weighted average number of shares outstanding over the
period) was $0.79 and $1.53 for the nine months ended September 30, 2022 and
2021, respectively.

Cash and capital resources

Financial condition


On September 30, 2022, we had $212.7 million in cash and cash equivalents
compared to $77.3 million of cash and cash equivalents on December 31, 2021. We
have incurred operating losses and negative cash flows from operations since our
inception. Net cash used for operating activities was $31.8 and $89.5 million
for the nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively. For the
nine months ended September 30, 2022, we recorded a net loss of $57 million. Our
net cash flows provided by financing activities increased to $194.4 million
during the nine months ended September 30, 2022 from $(0.1) million during the
nine months ended September 30, 2021. Financing activities consisted mainly of
our global offering in the second quarter of 2022.

We may seek to finance our future cash needs through a combination of public or
private equity or debt financings, collaborations, license and development
agreements and other forms of non-dilutive financings. A severe or prolonged
economic downturn could result in a variety of risks to us, including reduced
ability to raise additional capital when needed or on acceptable terms, if at
all.

If we are not successful in our financing objectives, we could have to scale
back our operations, notably by delaying or reducing the scope of our research
and development efforts or obtain financing through arrangements with
collaborators or others that may require us to relinquish rights to our product
candidates that we might otherwise seek to develop or commercialize
independently.

Our financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis assuming
that we will be successful in our financing objectives. As such, no adjustments
have been made to the financial statements relating to the recoverability and
classification of the asset carrying amounts or classification of liabilities
that might be necessary should we not be able to continue as a going concern.

Significant sources of liquidity and cash requirements


We have incurred net losses each year since our inception. Substantially all of
our net losses resulted from costs incurred in connection with our development
programs and from general and administrative expenses associated with our
operations. We have not incurred any bank debt.

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Contents

As of the date of filing, our available cash should be sufficient to support our operating plan for at least the next 12 months.


In May 2022, the Company announced that pursuant to the Company's ATM program,
it had issued and completed sales of new Ordinary Shares in the form of ADSs,
for a total gross amount of $15.3 million.

In June 2022, the Company announced an aggregate $194 million PIPE financing
(corresponding to €181 million on the basis of an exchange rate of $1.0739 =
€1.00 published by the European Central Bank on June 8, 2022) from the sale of
32,855,669 Ordinary Shares, as well as pre-funded warrants to purchase up to
28,276,331 Ordinary Shares.

We cannot guarantee that we will be able to obtain the necessary financing to
meet our needs or to obtain funds at attractive terms and conditions, including
as a result of disruptions to the global financial markets due to the ongoing
COVID-19 pandemic. A severe or prolonged economic downturn could result in a
variety of risks to us, including reduced ability to raise additional capital
when needed or on acceptable terms, if at all.

The following table presents our significant cash requirements for future periods:


                                                           Material Cash 

Requirements due by the period

                                                                               Ended
                                                                           September 30,
                                                  2023             2024         2025        Thereafter       Total
                                                                      (Amounts in thousands)
Operating leases                                    1,381            1,423          -                -         2,804
Purchase obligations - Obligations Under the
Terms of CRO Agreements                            12,411           36,234       7,805               -        56,450

Total                                              13,791           37,657       7,805               -        59,254


The commitment amounts in the table above are associated with contracts that are
enforceable and legally binding and that specify all significant terms,
including interest on long-term debt, fixed or minimum services to be used,
fixed, minimum or variable price provisions, and the approximate timing of the
actions under the contracts. The table does not include obligations under
agreements that we can cancel without a significant penalty.

Future events could cause actual payments to differ from these estimates.

Conditional advances


In 2014, BpiFrance Financement granted an interest-free Innovation loan to DBV
Technologies to help finance the pharmaceutical development of Viaskin™ Milk.
This amount was received in a single disbursement on November 27, 2014. In 2020,
due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Bpifrance postponed the repayments for a 6-month
period. Repayment ended during the third quarter of 2022.

Operating leases

Our head office is located at Montrouge, France. Our main offices occupy an area of ​​4,470 square meters, under a rental agreement dated March 3, 2015 and represents a $3 million need for cash
September 30, 2022 which expires March 8, 2024.


We also have facilities in North America that were initially intended to support
our U.S. subsidiary as well as future commercialization needs. We lease 3,780
square feet of office space in Tower 49, New York, New York. This lease is for a
period of 65 months and expires on February 25, 2023. In light of our global
restructuring, the current stage of regulatory interactions regarding Viaskin
Peanut, and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, we entered into a sublease agreement
of this office space in June 2021. The NYC office represents a $0.2 million cash
requirement as of September 30, 2022 until the first quarter of 2023.

On March 28, 2022, the Company entered into a binding office lease agreement in
New Jersey for a lease term of 3 years and 2 months. The lease commencement was
based upon delivery of possession of the premises by the Landlord and occurred
on April 1, 2022. The principal offices occupy a 5,799 square meter facility,
and represents a $0.4 million cash requirement as of September 30, 2022 which
expires May 1, 2025.

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Contents

Purchase Obligations – Obligations under CRO Agreements


In connection with the launch of our clinical trials for Viaskin Peanut and
Viaskin Milk, we signed agreements with several contract research organizations.
Expenses associated with the ongoing trials amounted globally to $125.9 million.
As of September 30, 2022, the amount we are still obligated to pay in connection
with these contracts through 2025 is $56.4 million.

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© Edgar Online, source Previews

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vehicle emergency power kit – Daily Bulldog https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/vehicle-emergency-power-kit-daily-bulldog/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 10:00:34 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/vehicle-emergency-power-kit-daily-bulldog/ FRANKLIN COUNTY – As we look forward to another New England winter, now is the time to assess your vehicle and make sure you are prepared for roadside emergencies. While the highways and back roads here in Franklin County offer scenic views and scenic landscapes, they are less than ideal places to be stranded, especially […]]]>

FRANKLIN COUNTY – As we look forward to another New England winter, now is the time to assess your vehicle and make sure you are prepared for roadside emergencies. While the highways and back roads here in Franklin County offer scenic views and scenic landscapes, they are less than ideal places to be stranded, especially if one is unprepared.

The National Safety Council recommends an emergency supply kit, containing tools and supplies for the vehicle and passengers.

My personal emergency kit includes lots of extra blankets, a Maine map, first aid supplies, water and snacks, and tools for basic roadside emergency vehicle repairs . For the past five years I have used everything but the fire extinguisher, either for myself or to help other motorists. (photo Annie Twitchell)

Don’t worry: you’re not going to pack an entire auto shop into your vehicle. The goal is to have tools and supplies to make quick roadside repairs and increase safety if you have to wait for a tow truck or emergency services. Things to consider include jumper cables, a basic household tool kit, extra flashlights and batteries, reflective triangles or cones, a tow rope, duct tape, and an automotive fire extinguisher. These items are available at a department store, hardware store, or automotive supply store.

Most vehicles are equipped with a spare tire, scissor jack or tripod and a wheel wrench or tire lever. Make sure they are the correct size for your vehicle and in good condition, and that your spare tire is properly inflated. (Your local mechanic may be able to help if needed.)

Even if you don’t know or can’t change a tire or replace a battery, having the tools available makes it easier for others to help you.

Being stranded by extreme weather conditions, whether hot or cold, can pose a serious health hazard to you and your passengers. In bad weather or in areas with no cell signal, it may take some time for help to arrive; being prepared can save your life.

Dehydration is a threat at any time, so keep drinking water in your vehicle year-round. In winter, plastic containers are generally better than metal or glass because plastic can expand and contract with freezing water with less risk of the container breaking. Smaller bottles can fit in cup holders that are often near heater vents, allowing water to thaw faster.

High-energy, non-perishable foods such as dried fruits, nuts, and hard candies are good options in case you’re stuck for hours. Consider any food allergies when packing food. It’s also a good idea to store food in an airtight metal box to keep pests away.

Other things to consider include a reflective vest, a raincoat or poncho, a cell phone car charger, some blankets, and a first aid kit. The National Safety Council suggests that a basic first aid kit should contain gauze, bandages, duct tape, scissors, latex-free gloves, tweezers and instant cold packs. You can also include aspirin, hydrocortisone, and antibiotic ointment. Check the dates of all medications and ointments to make sure they are still good.

Most of these items can be stored in a duffel bag or backpack in the trunk of the car or in the backseat.

Cold weather requires a few additional considerations. A snow brush and window scraper, shovel, cold weather washer fluid, warm clothes, good gloves or mittens, hat and coat, and sand or kitty litter for traction are always a good idea. Also, keeping your gas tank at least half full will give you a safety buffer and allow you to roll the vehicle to warm up.

Your emergency supply kit should contain the basics, but it can be customized to suit your needs. For example, if you regularly travel with young children, you might consider extra blankets, diapers, appropriate snacks, and a change of clothes for each child. I travel with my dog ​​regularly, so a water bowl, extra water, high energy treats, leash and blanket for her are important things in my emergency kit.

The National Safety Council recommends that your emergency power kit be checked and replenished every six months. Personally, I like to do this around the same time I get my winter tires changed in October and April; it’s an easy way for me to remember to check everything in my vehicle and make sure I’m prepared for the months ahead.

If you get stuck, stay with your vehicle; it provides safety and shelter, and makes it easier for rescuers to find you.

Take steps to be seen. While running your hazard lights will improve visibility, it can potentially drain your battery. Safety LED flashlights are readily available and have long battery life; consider finding a model that has a flash mode and magnets to hold it to the outside of your vehicle. Place the lights in a prominent location on the side or roof of your vehicle facing the roadway and try to ensure the light can be seen from both directions.

If you’re stuck in a winter storm, the National Weather Service recommends running the engine for about ten minutes every hour for heat. While the engine is running, open the window a little to allow fresh air to circulate and prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. Also, make sure the exhaust pipe is free of snow and other blockages. A reflective triangle or cone on the outside of your vehicle may not help if conditions are windy, but attaching a shiny piece of fabric to your door or antenna can help.

You don’t pack a full auto shop or the contents of an ambulance in the trunk of your car. The goal is to help keep you safe while you wait for help. Consider your needs, including the space you have in your vehicle.

No one expects to get stuck, but taking the time to prepare can make all the difference if it does happen.

For more information on emergency preparedness, Check out this program from Mt. Blue TV. Host Tom Saviello speaks with Franklin County Emergency Management Director Timothy Hardy, Wilton, Maine Fire Department Assistant Fire Chief Thomas Doak, and Joshua Bell of Northern Lights Stove and Recreation , to discuss what you need to have ready in an emergency, the basics of fire safety and the specifics of maintaining your propane, pellet or wood burning stove and fireplace.

Printable, PDF and email version
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Celebrating 25 years of Prairie Fare with a raffle – Agweek https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/celebrating-25-years-of-prairie-fare-with-a-raffle-agweek/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 10:38:46 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/celebrating-25-years-of-prairie-fare-with-a-raffle-agweek/ What were you doing in 1997? Some of you may not have been born yet. Others may remember the year well. In 1997, Bill Clinton was the president. The cost of a postage stamp was 32 cents. The Titanic movie was in theaters and the first Harry Potter book was released. The Mars Pathfinder has […]]]>

What were you doing in 1997? Some of you may not have been born yet. Others may remember the year well.

In 1997, Bill Clinton was the president. The cost of a postage stamp was 32 cents.

The Titanic movie was in theaters and the first Harry Potter book was released.

The Mars Pathfinder has arrived on Mars. Comet Hale Bopp was visible in 1997.

Sports fans may remember that the Green Bay Packers beat the New England Patriots in the Superbowl. Pete Sampras and Martina Hingis have each won Wimbledon.

Mother Theresa, Princess Diana, John Denver and James Stewart were among the notable people who died.

Of course, many other things happened in 1997. In North Dakota, we fought record flooding that year. We all built new “sandbag muscles” by gathering near the Red River. Automated sandbag filling units were developed later.

Julie GardenRobinson

Courtesy/NDSU Extension Service

On a personal note, my son was only two years old. In the next eight years, we would welcome two daughters.

Also in 1997, I started writing this “Prairie Fare” column.

“Writing a weekly column is a chore,” the editors warned.

I was puzzled. They are the ones who suggested I write a column. I guess they were realistic.

“I’ll give it a few months and see if there’s a newspaper that publishes the column,” I said.

For the first two years, I co-authored with an editor who was trained as a conductor. At the time, final edited columns were sent as printed copies via campus mail, not as emails.

My fellow writer left college and I was at a crossroads. I continued to write the column on my own. This week’s column is number 1300.

I’m having a little party. Unfortunately, I’m the only guest at my party because I have a column to write.

I have potential freebies for you readers to inspire my continued efforts. Without readers, a column ceases to exist.

I’m happy to report that at least 50 newspapers (online and print) have published this weekly column throughout the Midwest and Canada.

Here is the opportunity for gifts. Our latest edition of a printed 2023 calendar is ready. I plan to give away at least 25 copies based on a raffle by November 25th. This colorful calendar includes recipes, tips and information to explore. My student interns helped create the calendar, and I’m proud of their efforts.

To enter the drawing, visit

bit.ly/PrairieFare-draw

and answer questions. I will not use your information for anything other than the raffle. If the link does not work for you, please email me at julie.garden-robinson@ndsu.edu with “Calendar Drawing” in the subject. Please provide a topic of interest and your full mailing address for a chance to win a free 2023 calendar.

This is a food and nutrition column after all, so here are four tips for planning a healthy celebration.

1. Try to incorporate three or more food groups into celebration menus.

  • Provide a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables.
  • Provide whole grain options, such as whole grain crackers or popcorn.
  • Include a dairy product or another source of calcium, such as mozzarella cheese cubes or yogurt parfaits.
  • Include a variety of protein options, from lean meats to beans and other legumes in dips and appetizers.

2. Get creative with your food displays. “Charcuterie” boards weren’t widely known 25 years ago, but people appreciate artful arrangements of cheese, meat, nuts, fruits, vegetables, breads and crackers.
3. When making your celebratory recipes, consider making healthy swaps. For example, fat-free yogurt can be replaced with sour cream or mayonnaise in dips. About half of the white flour in many recipes can be replaced with whole wheat flour. About half of the oil and other fats in some baked goods can be replaced with applesauce.

4. Don’t forget to include options for people with special dietary needs, such as gluten intolerance, lactose intolerance, and nut allergies. For more information on food allergens, visit the NDSU Extension website at

ndsu.ag/food-allergens

.

I bet you’re expecting cake for this party. I suggest a chocolate dip for dessert. By the way, the 2023 calendar has a black bean fudge brownie recipe. Any food can be integrated, in moderation, into a healthy diet.

1 can (15 ounces) chickpeas, drained and rinsed
1/3 cup honey
½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1 ½ teaspoons of vanilla
¼ tsp salt
3 to 4 tablespoons of water
Foods for dipping (fresh fruit such as strawberries, graham crackers, vanilla wafers)

Drain and rinse the chickpeas and place them in a food processor. Place all other ingredients in the same food processor and puree until a smooth texture is visible. If needed, add additional honey a tablespoon at a time until the desired level of sweetness is reached. Serve with fruits like strawberries, graham crackers.

Makes 11 servings (2 tbsp). Each serving contains 70 calories, 0.5 grams of fat, 14 grams of carbohydrates, 2 grams of fiber and 105 milligrams of sodium.

Julie Garden-Robinson, Ph.D., RD, LRD, is a food and nutrition specialist at North Dakota State University Extension and a professor in the Department of Health Sciences, nutrition and exercise. Follow her on Twitter @jgardenrobinson.

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Identify food intolerances for a healthy and comfortable diet https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/identify-food-intolerances-for-a-healthy-and-comfortable-diet/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 05:09:41 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/identify-food-intolerances-for-a-healthy-and-comfortable-diet/ It is important for us to be fully aware of how our bodies react to different foods and what we may need to add or remove from our meals to ensure a healthy and balanced diet. (Photo: Pexels) Food is necessary for life and for many of us it is a source of great pleasure. […]]]>

It is important for us to be fully aware of how our bodies react to different foods and what we may need to add or remove from our meals to ensure a healthy and balanced diet. (Photo: Pexels)

Food is necessary for life and for many of us it is a source of great pleasure. However, some foods can cause us significant discomfort and can even be life-threatening.

It is important for us to be fully aware of how our bodies react to different foods and what we may need to add or remove from our meals to ensure a healthy, balanced diet that leaves us feeling fed and comfortable.

Food intolerances and food allergies are all reactions to specific foods. We need to watch what we eat to make sure we don’t put too much stress on our bodies. Let’s break down these terms, what they look like in our bodies, and how to get advice from a medical professional to navigate a diagnosis.

What are food intolerances?

Food intolerances are sensitivities to certain foods that affect your digestive system. People who suffer from food intolerance are unable to digest certain foods or specific ingredients in those foods, which further irritates the digestive system. Although food intolerances are not life-threatening, they can be very uncomfortable and disruptive for those affected.

Reactions caused by food intolerance usually occur a few hours after eating. Symptoms of food intolerance include:

Abdominal (belly) pain

Diarrhea

Gas and/or bloating

Stomach pains

Reflux

Stomach ache

Headaches or migraines

Stomach pains

Nausea

Irritability

Common food intolerances include lactose intolerance and wheat/gluten intolerance. Otherwise, it is possible that there is an intolerance to a food additive, chemical or contaminant. These types of intolerances can be a reaction to:

Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)

Caffeine

Alcohol

Artificial sweeteners

Artificial food colors, preservatives and flavor enhancers.

Toxins, viruses, bacteria or parasites that have contaminated food.

Some symptoms of food intolerances can be symptoms of other illnesses which can make them difficult to diagnose.

If you have observed any of the above symptoms after eating specific foods and are concerned that you have a food intolerance, contact your doctor for advice.

Difference Between Food Intolerance and Allergy

A food allergy is a reaction of your immune system rather than your digestive system. Your immune system sends a signal to protect your body from a threat mistakenly triggered by a particular food or ingredient. Symptoms of an allergic reaction often occur immediately after ingestion, unlike hours later as an intolerance. It can also be triggered by tiny amounts of particles rather than an excess. Common food allergies include seafood, shellfish, and tree nut allergies.

Symptoms of a food allergy can affect different parts of the body at the same time. It is important to point out that allergic reactions can become life threatening and require emergency care. Symptoms of an allergic reaction to food include:

Itching sensation inside the mouth, throat or ears.

A raised rash or hives

Swelling of the face, lips, tongue, eyes and palate.

Vomiting

Breathing problems that can lead to anaphylaxis

An over-the-counter antihistamine can be used to treat mild to moderate allergic reactions to food. Otherwise, injections of adrenaline and/or higher doses of antihistamine will be necessary.

How do I determine if I have a food intolerance?

Food intolerances can appear at any time in our lives. It is possible to break out of old intolerances and develop new ones as we age. The best tools we have for determining if we have a food intolerance is a process of careful observation and experimentation. Two main ways to do this are an “elimination diet” and a “food diary”.

An elimination diet involves removing the food from your diet that you think is causing problems. You won’t have this food at all for two to six weeks. You then slowly introduce that element back into your diet and consider how your body reacts to it and the amounts that cause reactions. On the other hand, a food diary includes keeping track of what you eat, what symptoms you experience after eating, and when those symptoms occur, without the need to cut out an item from your diet.

Once you’re sure you have a food intolerance, the only way to manage the side effects is to stop eating that food altogether. Or, from your documentation, assess what amounts of these foods cause reactions. Going forward, you need to stay alert and careful by watching your food intake and checking labels to make sure you’re protecting yourself against ingesting something you’re intolerant to.

None of these methods are highly scientific, moreover, they can also be time consuming and difficult to follow. However, the reward far outweighs any inconvenience.

Technological advances in healthcare, including telemedicine, give you 24/7 access to doctors. No matter what difficulty you may encounter during your elimination diet or food diary, your doctor can guide you anytime, anywhere. Also, once you identify the problem, your doctor can guide you in creating a safe and nutritious diet.

When should I consult a doctor for my food intolerances?

If you think you need treatment, food intolerances can be diagnosed and treated via telemedicine. Your GP can usually diagnose lactose intolerance, for example by observing your symptoms and reviewing your medical history. You can do this through online consultations on platforms such as MDLink, which can allow you to get treatment from the comfort and convenience of your home, especially if you are experiencing the uncomfortable symptoms of intolerance. You may be referred to a specialist if your GP deems it necessary.

For children, parents should contact a pediatrician to discuss their child’s symptoms. It is crucial not to limit children’s food as they grow. Therefore, your doctor will be able to guide you in developing a diet with all the necessary nutrients and intolerance considerations to give your child.

General practitioners, gastroenterologists (digestive experts) and pediatricians are all available online via MDLink. They can send you a prescription to treat your symptoms and refer you to recommended lab tests to guide you to a possible diagnosis. However, if you experience severe abdominal pain, extreme diarrhea, unexplained weight loss, or any other symptom that may seem emergent, it is crucial that you receive emergency in-person care immediately.

Having a food intolerance can be very uncomfortable and embarrassing. However, as with your overall health, paying attention to your body and responding appropriately to its cues can guide you to your healthiest and most comfortable life. While enjoying the benefits of telemedicine, you can receive personalized and private care from wherever you feel most comfortable discussing your digestive issues.

Dr. Ché Bowen, digital health entrepreneur and family physician, is the CEO and founder of MDLink, a digital health company that provides telemedicine options. Visit the Company’s website at www.theMDLink.com. You can also contact him at drchebowen@themdlink.com.

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