Anaphylaxis – Parents Of Allergic Children http://parentsofallergicchildren.org/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 01:39:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-5.png Anaphylaxis – Parents Of Allergic Children http://parentsofallergicchildren.org/ 32 32 Recalled Chocolate Candies https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/recalled-chocolate-candies/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 01:39:00 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/recalled-chocolate-candies/ Pimlico Confectioners, which has already issued a recall for some of its products, is expanding it to include Keats London Vegan Irish Cream Truffles and Keats London Vegan Hazelnut Dark Chocolate as they contain milk. Milk is not mentioned on the ingredient label in its packaging. Therefore, the products pose a potential health risk to […]]]>

Pimlico Confectioners, which has already issued a recall for some of its products, is expanding it to include Keats London Vegan Irish Cream Truffles and Keats London Vegan Hazelnut Dark Chocolate as they contain milk. Milk is not mentioned on the ingredient label in its packaging. Therefore, the products pose a potential health risk to anyone allergic or intolerant to milk or milk constituents. The current Product Recall Information Notice has been updated to include additional products and replace earlier versions, per Food Agency Standards.

For consumers who have purchased the products and have an allergy or intolerance to milk or milk constituents, the company encourages all not to consume them. Instead, the company is asking consumers to return them to the store where they were purchased for a full refund. Further information can be obtained by contacting the company at info@keatschocolatier.co.uk or 02032394088.

By Mayo Clinic, a milk allergy is one of the most common food allergies in children in particular. A reaction is caused simply by drinking milk. Symptoms of the reaction include hives, wheezing, itching around the lips, swelling of the lips, tongue or throat, coughing and vomiting. Other symptoms may include abdominal cramps, runny nose, and diarrhea that may include blood, which may take longer to develop. In some cases, milk can cause anaphylaxis, which requires immediate medical help. Symptoms range from mild to severe, depending on the patient.

Several food recalls have taken place in the past few months alone. Some include pizza, pork sausage, salmon, sandwiches, ice cream, pasta, and even dog food.

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Timely injection of epinephrine can save lives https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/timely-injection-of-epinephrine-can-save-lives/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 21:53:23 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/timely-injection-of-epinephrine-can-save-lives/ By Joe Graedon, MS, and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. By Joe Graedon, MS, and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. Q Thanks for warning that wasp stings could trigger a life-threatening reaction. I had an anaphylactic reaction to a food preservative so I know how scary it is. After suffering three wasp stings over several years, with each reaction […]]]>

By Joe Graedon, MS, and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.

By Joe Graedon, MS, and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.

Q Thanks for warning that wasp stings could trigger a life-threatening reaction. I had an anaphylactic reaction to a food preservative so I know how scary it is.

After suffering three wasp stings over several years, with each reaction getting faster and more severe, my allergist prescribed me an epinephrine injector. He asked me to call 911 immediately after an injection and wait for help, using the second injector if help did not arrive within 20 minutes. I should NOT drive myself or be taken to the ER because I could pass out in the car. Please alert your readers.

A. An injection of epinephrine can save life during a severe allergic reaction. Make sure your epinephrine auto-injector is not expired.

Q After several years on prednisone for osteoarthritis, my doctor insists that I stop this drug. No one gave me advice on how to quit, and the withdrawal is unbearable. My joints are screaming and I can barely walk.

I’m tempted to take the prednisone again to relieve myself a little. The NSAIDs that most people use are not an option for me. Can you recommend anything else?

A. Prednisone is a powerful anti-inflammatory with many serious side effects. This is probably why your doctor discourages long-term use. But stopping this drug safely requires your doctor to supervise a very slow reduction over several months.

We wrote more about the dangers of steroids for arthritis in “The Graedons’ Guide to Alternatives for Arthritis”. This 104-page publication is available in the book section of the store at www.PeoplesPharmacy.com.

It outlines options for arthritis pain relief, including ashwagandha, boswellia, curcumin, ginger, and stinging nettle. Some people find home remedies such as tart cherries, gin-soaked raisins, and vegetable pectin in grape juice can also be helpful.

Q I wonder if you have any information on the possibility of COVID-19 vaccines causing tinnitus. My son developed a mild case after his first injection which was significantly worsened by his second injection.

Several other people I know had the same reaction. After my second reminder, I developed mild hearing loss.

I had acupuncture, which was somewhat helpful. Are there other ways to get relief? I fear that young children will develop hearing loss.

A. Researchers have reported that tinnitus (ringing in the ears) may occur as an adverse reaction to COVID-19 vaccines (Audiology Research, June 2022). It is considered a rare side effect, although it is unclear how scientists determine the frequency. As the authors note, “there is a lack of systematization and standardization in the collection of clinical information, as well as in the management of patients.” To translate this into English, studies have not been well organized to assess such complications.

People who have been infected with the virus and now suffer from COVID-19 for a long time often count tinnitus among their symptoms (Frontiers in Neurology, April 25, 2022).

A German survey conducted almost a year after the infection revealed that 30% of them reported tinnitus in their clinical picture, as well as dizziness.

However, the treatment is delicate. Some clinicians offer repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, June 7, 2022).

Egyptian researchers report that a simple breathing technique – buzzing bees – can be effective (Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, June 3, 2022). This is a pranayama yoga approach described online.

In their column, Joe and Teresa Graedon respond to letters from readers. Write to King Features, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803, or email them through their website: www.PeoplesPharmacy.com. Their latest book is “Top Screwups Doctors Make and How to Avoid Them”.

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Adamis Pharmaceuticals Calendar – GuruFocus.com https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/adamis-pharmaceuticals-calendar-gurufocus-com/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 23:07:28 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/adamis-pharmaceuticals-calendar-gurufocus-com/ SAN DIEGO, May 09, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Adamis Pharmaceuticals Corporation (ADMP), a biopharmaceutical company developing and commercializing specialty products for allergies, opioid overdoses, respiratory and inflammatory diseases, announced today that it will host an investor conference call on Monday, May 16, 2022 at 2 p.m. PT to discuss its financials and operating results for […]]]>

SAN DIEGO, May 09, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Adamis Pharmaceuticals Corporation (ADMP), a biopharmaceutical company developing and commercializing specialty products for allergies, opioid overdoses, respiratory and inflammatory diseases, announced today that it will host an investor conference call on Monday, May 16, 2022 at 2 p.m. PT to discuss its financials and operating results for the first quarter of 2022 as well as a business update. The Company’s press release regarding its first quarter 2022 financial results is expected to be available after 1:00 p.m. PT on May 16, 2022, and on its website.

Event: Adamis Pharmaceuticals First Quarter 2022 Financial Results Conference Call
When: Monday, May 16, 2022
Time: 2:00 p.m. PT (5:00 p.m. ET)
Call in the United States (toll-free): (844) 825-9789
Toll Free/International: (412) 317-5180
Conference ID: 10167229

Dennis J. Carlo, Ph.D., President and CEO of Adamis, will host the call along with other members of the leadership team. The call is open to the public and will provide an update on recent developments, events that have taken place during the year and some goals for future periods. Forward-looking statements regarding expectations regarding future business performance may be made during the conference call.

A live audio webcast of the conference call will also be available via this linkwith a replay available shortly after the live event.

About Adamis Pharmaceuticals

Adamis Pharmaceuticals Corporation is a specialty biopharmaceutical company primarily focused on the development and commercialization of products in various therapeutic areas, including allergy, opioid overdose, respiratory and inflammatory diseases. From the company SYMJEPI® (epinephrine) Injectable products are FDA approved for use in the emergency treatment of acute allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis. From the company ZIMHI™ (naloxone) Injectable product is approved for the treatment of opioid overdoses. Tempol is being developed for the treatment of patients with COVID-19 and a Phase 2/3 clinical trial is underway. For more information on Adamis Pharmaceuticals, please visit our website and follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Contact:

Adamis Investor Relations
Robert Uhl
General director
ICR Westwicke
619.228.5886
[email protected]

Adamis-Pharmaceuticals-Corpora.png

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Is appendicitis a side effect of the COVID-19 vaccine? https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/is-appendicitis-a-side-effect-of-the-covid-19-vaccine/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 00:33:47 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/is-appendicitis-a-side-effect-of-the-covid-19-vaccine/ You may have heard of several side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine. But appendicitis is probably not one of them. Although appendicitis has been documented after the COVID-19 vaccine, it is still unclear whether it is an adverse reaction to the vaccine. Research on this topic has yielded mixed results. Below, we’ll discuss appendicitis in […]]]>

You may have heard of several side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine. But appendicitis is probably not one of them.

Although appendicitis has been documented after the COVID-19 vaccine, it is still unclear whether it is an adverse reaction to the vaccine. Research on this topic has yielded mixed results.

Below, we’ll discuss appendicitis in more detail, its potential link to the COVID-19 vaccine, and its known side effects from the COVID-19 vaccine. Keep reading to learn more.

Appendicitis occurs when your appendix becomes inflamed. Your appendix is ​​a hollow pouch attached to your large intestine. It’s in the lower right part of your abdomen.

When the opening of the appendix becomes blocked, it can lead to appendicitis. Some things that can cause blockages include:

Sometimes the exact cause of appendicitis is unknown. Either way, blocking the opening of the appendix leads to a buildup of bacteria and inflammation. This causes symptoms such as:

Appendicitis is a medical emergency. If not treated quickly, the appendix can burst, leading to serious and life-threatening complications like peritonitis and abscess formation.

Appendicitis has been reported following vaccination against COVID-19. A possible mechanism for this could be enlarged or swollen lymph nodes in the body after vaccination.

Research on this topic is conflicting. Some data indicate that appendicitis may be a potential adverse effect of vaccination, while others note that the risk of appendicitis after vaccination is no higher than in the general population.

Appendicitis detected in COVID-19 vaccine trials

Appendicitis was noted in the large clinical trial of the Pfizer-BioNTech mRNA COVID-19 vaccine. Of 43,448 trial participants, 8 in the vaccine group and 4 in the placebo group developed appendicitis.

These cases were considered unrelated to vaccination. This is because they did not occur more frequently than expected in the general population.

Research indicating that appendicitis is an adverse effect of the COVID-19 vaccine

A study 2021 examined the adverse effects of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine on more than 1.7 million people in Israel. The researchers used a matched group of vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals for each adverse effect.

The adverse event most strongly associated with vaccination was myocarditis. But the researchers also found an increased risk of swollen lymph nodes and appendicitis.

Another one study 2021 looked at appendicitis after COVID-19 vaccination using a database from the World Health Organization (WHO). At the time of the study, researchers estimated that 1.82 billion doses of the vaccine had been administered worldwide.

From the database, the researchers were able to find 334 unique reports of appendicitis after vaccination. Most of them were associated with mRNA vaccines and occurred 0-4 days after vaccination.

The researchers found that the number of cases of appendicitis after vaccination was slightly higher than expected. They concluded that appendicitis was a possible adverse effect of the COVID-19 vaccination, but that further research was needed.

Research indicating that appendicitis is NOT an adverse reaction to the COVID-19 vaccine

A study 2021 disagree with the conclusions above. In this study, researchers in the United States assessed vaccine safety data from the Vaccine Safety Datalink for 23 adverse events.

A total of 11,845,128 doses of mRNA vaccine administered to 6.2 million people were included in the study. The researchers found that the incidence of appendicitis in people receiving an mRNA vaccine was not significantly higher than expected.

A study 2022 looked at appendicitis and vaccination against COVID-19 in a large cohort of people in Denmark. The researchers compared more than 4 million people vaccinated with an mRNA vaccine to an unvaccinated reference group.

Appendicitis has been found to occur in about 8 cases per 100,000 people vaccinated. When this rate was compared to the rate of appendicitis in the unvaccinated reference group, no significant difference was found.

According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)the most common side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine are:

  • swelling, redness, or pain at the injection site
  • fatigue
  • fever, with or without chills
  • muscle aches
  • headache
  • nausea

These side effects are a sign that your immune system is mounting a response to the vaccine. Vaccine side effects usually go away on their own within a few days. In the meantime, you can help mitigate them by:

  • stay hydrated
  • to rest
  • place a cold compress over the injection site
  • taking over-the-counter medications like acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) for symptoms like fever and pain

If your side effects do not go away within a few days or start to get worse, contact a doctor.

COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective in preventing serious illness, hospitalizations and death from COVID-19. As such, the CDC currently recommends COVID-19 vaccines and boosters for anyone age 5 and older.

Vaccination is especially essential for people with a increased risk of severe COVID-19 disease. This includes, but is not limited to, immunocompromised people and those with medical conditions such as:

Getting immunity through vaccination is also safer than getting immunity by having COVID-19. Contracting SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can cause severe illness in some people and lead to long-term health problems, including long COVID.

Although any treatment, drug or vaccine has risks, the risks of serious complications from COVID-19 are extremely low. This includes appendicitis.

For example, according to CDC, anaphylaxis only occurs in 5 out of 1 million vaccine doses. Additionally, out of more than 55 million doses of vaccine given to people under the age of 18, only 647 cases of myocarditis have been confirmed.

Although appendicitis has been reported as a result of the COVID-19 vaccine, it is not entirely clear if this is an actual adverse effect of vaccination. Research results have been mixed on this topic, and more research is needed overall.

Anyway, appendicitis after vaccination happened very rarely.

Overall, the benefits of receiving a COVID-19 vaccine outweigh the potential risks. If you have any concerns about the COVID-19 vaccine, discuss them with a doctor.

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Allergic from Surrey: ‘I ended up in intensive care because of my dad’s aftershave’ https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/allergic-from-surrey-i-ended-up-in-intensive-care-because-of-my-dads-aftershave/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 05:04:00 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/allergic-from-surrey-i-ended-up-in-intensive-care-because-of-my-dads-aftershave/ An entrepreneur spoke about the bullying she faced at school due to her severe allergies. Julianne Ponan had her first anaphylactic incident aged just two and has since experienced several episodes and once ended up in intensive care when she inhaled her father’s aftershave. But the 33-year-old remembers feeling separated from her classmates because of […]]]>

An entrepreneur spoke about the bullying she faced at school due to her severe allergies. Julianne Ponan had her first anaphylactic incident aged just two and has since experienced several episodes and once ended up in intensive care when she inhaled her father’s aftershave.

But the 33-year-old remembers feeling separated from her classmates because of the risk she faces with her allergies. This prevented her from attending birthday parties or sleeping over with her friends.

Julianne has multiple allergies from peanuts to perfumes and certain medications and her mother Yvette has helped her through some difficult times. “I know what it’s like to find that you’re having trouble breathing and you don’t even know what’s causing it,” Julianne said. “My first attack was at nursery and I collapsed, stopped breathing and was rushed to hospital. That’s where I found out I had the anaphylaxis.

READ MORE: A skate park is about to be demolished as a community group accuses the council of inaction

“I was tested for many things and had multiple allergies. It was very serious because it was airborne as well as drinking and touching. From an early age my mum had to avoid a lot of things – I couldn’t go to birthday parties, sleepovers, things like that.

“In elementary school, I had to sit on the allergy table. I sat alone and not with my friends. So it made me feel very isolated and not included, which I don’t think a child should feel like that. You end up being bullied for no reason.

She had once put nuts in her pocket as a joke at school, but she was lucky her mother had found them before Julianne had a chance to touch them. “She found them when I came home from school and she obviously walked right in and was really annoyed,” she said.

“Restaurant Eating Anxiety”

“It’s really about educating from the primary level. And unfortunately a lot of people said things like “you must have the worst diet ever because you can’t eat anything”, or “you can’t sit with us because you have allergies”, or “you can’t come to my house because my mom says you’re picky”.

“And then in addition, the anxiety of even going to someone’s house. So for me, I ended up getting very apprehensive about eating at someone’s house or eating out.



Julianne supports MedicAlert alongside her mother Yvette

Julianne remembers one of the worst anaphylactic episodes she had at an Asian restaurant with her family. She said the restaurant told them it was completely nut-free.

“I touched it to my lip and literally had a massive anaphylactic allergy and had to be rushed to hospital. I was very afraid. I couldn’t breathe, I remember that one.

The owner of Creative Nature Superfoods, based in West Molesey, Surrey, has had quite a few attacks over the years and knows how to deal with symptoms very quickly. “I know when I should have for example an antihistamine, when I should take my EpiPen and when obviously I should call 999.

“I recently had an allergy to something in the office. Even though we have allergy training in our office, a few people froze while others didn’t. So it’s interesting to see how different people have treated it.

“But myself, I’m probably calmer now than I was when I was a kid and I also had a phobia of needles so I was running away from the EpiPen but also being very scared when you can’t breathe, you feel like you’re choking slowly, you’re afraid you won’t wake up by closing your eyes, it’s such a horrible and scary feeling, but your body kind of feels like it’s letting go.

“I was not taken seriously”

Julianne’s dedication to helping improve the lives of families living with allergies is tireless. In addition to lobbying on behalf of allergy sufferers in the press, social media and politicians, Julianne founded Creative Nature Superfoods 10 years ago. She’s launched a line of 14 top healthy, allergen-free foods for people like her.

Asked about the challenges she faced, she said: “Not being taken seriously. I looked very young at the time in addition to being a woman of color. I guess that also played a role. I didn’t care about trade shows. I went out for investments and they called me a little girl. But since then we have gotten better and better.

“We really want to become a household name for freeform and make sure anyone with an allergy doesn’t have to miss any of these sorts of things.”



Julianne started her own business to support families with allergies
Julianne started her own business to support families with allergies

Julianne, from Walton, said she received letters from children thanking her for allowing them to eat specific foods without having to worry about an allergic reaction. “For example, we had a letter saying, ‘thank you, you celebrated my birthday, I’ve never been able to eat a chocolate cake before’. We get loads of things on social media saying “I’ve never eaten Maltesers and now I can finally eat something that I think tastes the same,” she said.

“It really makes such a difference. I think it makes such a difference to everyone on the team when we get feedback like that because it shows that we really do make a difference to people.

First Ambassador

She was recently named the first ambassador for the MedicAlert charity, the only charity in the UK to offer medical identification services. The MedicAlert Foundation has 57 years of experience as a charity helping as many people as possible to access its services. Their identifiers are worn on the pulse points like a bracelet or a necklace.

They will be seen in an emergency by first responders. This allows the best initial treatment to be quickly identified, including drugs not to be given.

“I am honored to have been asked to take on this role and raise awareness about medical ID cards. When you have a condition like mine, wearing something like this is easy and a no-brainer. This means that if I was unable to communicate, medical professionals could treat me safely,” Julianne said.

“I support this association alongside my mother Yvette. She suffered a sudden and unexpected brain aneurysm last year. Miraculously, she survived, but she may find communication difficult.

Following her recent work with MedicAlert, Julianne’s mother Yvette, who suffered an unexpected brain aneurysm a year ago, is also wearing one so first responders know her recent medical history.

MedicAlert CEO Kirsten Giles said, “We appreciate the enormous challenges faced by individuals, parents and families who suffer from allergies, whether it’s gaming, parties or going to the restaurant.

“Every activity requires careful planning, and being a MedicAlert member makes a lot of those things easier. We are delighted that Julianne is helping to raise awareness of our charity which provides allergy sufferers with the peace of mind they need to live life to the fullest.”

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How to Spot the Stages of Anaphylaxis https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/how-to-spot-the-stages-of-anaphylaxis/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 13:01:34 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/how-to-spot-the-stages-of-anaphylaxis/ Many allergy sufferers experience mild symptoms, such as itchy eyes, which are bothersome but usually harmless. But some allergic reactions called anaphylaxis can be so severe that they are life-threatening. Anyone with an allergy can experience anaphylaxis. However, some people with other underlying medical conditions, such as allergic asthma, may be even more likely to […]]]>

Many allergy sufferers experience mild symptoms, such as itchy eyes, which are bothersome but usually harmless. But some allergic reactions called anaphylaxis can be so severe that they are life-threatening. Anyone with an allergy can experience anaphylaxis. However, some people with other underlying medical conditions, such as allergic asthma, may be even more likely to have a severe reaction, which means having anaphylaxis is especially important for them. on their radar.

Normally, your immune system attacks potentially harmful substances like viruses and bacteria to keep you healthy, according to the United States National Library of Medicine (NLM). In people with allergies, the immune system attacks a benign substance, such as food or tree pollen. The same basic process occurs during anaphylaxis, except the reaction and symptoms are more severe1 and affect the whole body rather than an isolated area, such as the upper respiratory system.

About 1 in 50 people in the United States have experienced anaphylaxis, but some experts believe the rate is even higher, according to the American Asthma and Allergy Foundation (AFA). You can’t predict when you or someone you love may have a very serious allergic reaction, but you can identify anaphylaxis and react quickly if you ever need to.

Here’s what happens during anaphylaxis:

First, you are exposed to an allergen.

Allergens are basically substances that trigger an allergic reaction in your body. They can be ingested, touched, injected or inhaled, depending on the AFOA. Allergens vary from person to person, but food is one of the main causes of anaphylaxis, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Common culprits include:

  • Eggs
  • Cow milk
  • Many types of nuts, including peanuts, cashews, and walnuts
  • Seafood like shrimp, lobster and clams
  • Fish
  • Soy, found in many foods like edamame, ice cream, and tempeh
  • Wheat, a common ingredient in bread, cereals and pasta

Medications (most commonly injection medications), bee and wasp insect venom, and latex can also trigger anaphylaxis, according to Mayo Clinic. Very rarely, some people experience anaphylaxis during strenuous exercise, such as running, for unknown reasons, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

Your body reacts, triggering a wave of symptoms.

Once your immune system detects that you have been exposed to an allergen, it launches an attack, releasing inflammatory chemicals such as histamine to fight off the perceived invader.

“Anaphylactic symptoms occur because your immune system releases several chemicals in large amounts after exposure to the allergen,” Thanai Pongdee, MDan immunologist from Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, says SELF.

An anaphylactic reaction usually occurs within minutes or seconds of exposure to an allergen, according to the Mayo Clinic. But anaphylaxis can also be delayed for hours, which can make it a bit harder to pinpoint the potential trigger.

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Here’s what to do when you get stung by a bee https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/heres-what-to-do-when-you-get-stung-by-a-bee/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 21:02:55 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/heres-what-to-do-when-you-get-stung-by-a-bee/ OEvery time I get the chance to enjoy an ice cream cone in the summer, it seems like a bee is always nearby, threatening to sting me. Granted, the bees hiding near my treat are tame if left alone, but bee stings can happen to anyone and they are painful. A sting occurs when an […]]]>

OEvery time I get the chance to enjoy an ice cream cone in the summer, it seems like a bee is always nearby, threatening to sting me. Granted, the bees hiding near my treat are tame if left alone, but bee stings can happen to anyone and they are painful.

A sting occurs when an insect, such as a bee, wasp or hornet, lands on you and inserts its stinger into your skin. These stingers usually have venom on them, although the effect depends on the insect. For most honey bees, dart venom contains proteins that impact the skin and immune system. This usually causes pain, swelling, redness, itching and pain. For allergy sufferers, the Mayo Clinic says the sting can cause anaphylaxis, a dangerous allergic reaction characterized by flushing, difficulty breathing, swelling, a dangerously low heart rate, and the need for emergency medical attention.

What to do immediately after being bitten? If there are signs of an allergic reaction like hives, difficulty breathing, swelling of the face, mouth, or tongue, seek emergency medical attention immediately, Dr. Malka says. But if you’re not allergic, you can treat a bee sting yourself, says Terez Malka, MDemergency physician and pediatrician at Digital Care Company Health K.

Below, Dr. Malka explains exactly what you should do when a bee stings.

Here’s what to do for a bee sting

Move to a safe place

Make sure you are away from other bees to prevent a swarm from stinging you further. Also, you’ll want to go to a place where you can relax to make sure you don’t have an allergic reaction. According to the Mayo Clinic, bee allergies are not uncommon and can develop very quickly after being stung. Knowing your allergic status and keeping an EpiPen handy is really important for this reason.

So, while you’re calming down, watch for any signs of a potential allergic reaction. If you or the person stung are allergic to bees, use an EpiPen (if available) and seek emergency care.

Carefully remove the stinger

If the stinger is still present, scrape it out gently using a clean fingernail or gauze, depending on the Centers for Disaster Control and Prevention (CDC). Using a firm, clean credit card or other small straight edge may also suffice, says Dr. Malka.

However, the CDC and Dr. Malka both advise never to use tweezers to remove a stinger. This is because plucking a stinger can squeeze it out and release more venom into the skin.

Apply a cold compress or ice to the area

Applying a cool compress or ice to the area has many benefits, such as relieving the tingling sensation, helping with swelling, and reducing redness, Dr. Malka says. Ice the area for 10 to 20 minutes, then let the skin rest for a while until it warms up and the swelling returns.

Take over-the-counter medications based on your symptoms

You can also use over-the-counter medications like ibuprofen for pain or swelling and diphenhydramine (Benadryl) for itching and swelling, Dr. Malka says. Be sure not to scratch or squeeze the area, as this can increase your risk of infection.

Once you’ve completed these steps, Dr. Malk recommends monitoring your symptoms. Swelling may persist, which is why experts recommend over-the-counter medications. The Mayo Clinic suggests you see a doctor if your bite has not healed after 10 days.

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Annals On Call – Intravenous Iron: Rarely a Cause of Anaphylaxis https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/annals-on-call-intravenous-iron-rarely-a-cause-of-anaphylaxis/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 21:20:23 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/annals-on-call-intravenous-iron-rarely-a-cause-of-anaphylaxis/ Memberships: Huntsville Regional Medical Campus, University of Alabama Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama (RMC) Department of Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (JLC) Center for Pharmacoepidemiology and Treatment Sciences, Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, Department of Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson School […]]]>
Memberships:

Huntsville Regional Medical Campus, University of Alabama Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama (RMC)

Department of Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (JLC)

Center for Pharmacoepidemiology and Treatment Sciences, Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, Department of Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine, New Brunswick, and Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Rutgers School of Public Health, Piscataway, New Jersey (SS)

Disclosures: Dr. Centor reports consulting fees from DynaMed and employment with the US Department of Veterans Affairs. Dr. Carson cites grants or contracts from the National Heart, Lung, Blood Institute; PCORI; Janssen; Synavir; and Olatec Therapeutics. He also reports consulting fees from the National Institute on Aging and BioAge Labs and his participation on a data security oversight committee or advisory board for Cerus. Dr. Setoguchi reports grants or contracts from Bristol Myers Squibb, Daiichi Sankyo and Pfizer and consultancy fees from Pfizer Japan, Merck and Bristol Myers Squibb. All relevant financial relationships have been mitigated. Disclosures can also be viewed at www.acponline.org/authors/icmje/ConflictOfInterestForms.do?msNum=A21-0012.

Publisher Disclosures: Christine Laine, MD, MPH, editor, reports that her spouse has stock options/assets with Targeted Diagnostics and Therapeutics. Stephanie Chang, MD, MPH, associate editor, reports employment with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, a travel allowance from the International Guidelines Network, and service on the Methodology Committee of the Institute of patient-centered outcome research. Vineet Chopra, MD, MSc, Associate Editor, reports on grants received from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and royalties from UpToDate and Oxford University Press. Deborah Cotton, MD, MPH, associate editor, reports that she has no financial relationships or interests to disclose. Eliseo Guallar, MD, MPH, DrPH, Associate Editor, Statistics, reports that he is employed at Johns Hopkins University. Christina C. Wee, MD, MPH, associate editor, reports employment at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and consultancy at Boston Medical Center. Sankey V. Williams, MD, associate editor, reports that he has no financial relationships or interests to disclose. Yu-Xiao Yang, MD, MSCE, associate editor, reports employment at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine and consultations with the US Food and Drug Administration and the state of Colorado .

This article was published on Annals.org June 7, 2022.

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Republican candidates for County Council president question their Democratic ties https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/republican-candidates-for-county-council-president-question-their-democratic-ties/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/republican-candidates-for-county-council-president-question-their-democratic-ties/ At a glance, the choice between Pete DiCianni and Greg Hart to become the Republican nominee for DuPage County Council President later this month might seem like a draw. Everyone is already a member of the County Council. Each says he is tough on crime, fiscally responsible and compassionate to those afflicted by drug addiction. […]]]>

At a glance, the choice between Pete DiCianni and Greg Hart to become the Republican nominee for DuPage County Council President later this month might seem like a draw.

Everyone is already a member of the County Council. Each says he is tough on crime, fiscally responsible and compassionate to those afflicted by drug addiction. Each racked up dozens of endorsements and hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign money while voicing similar goals for office.

But their seemingly small political differences did not dull the salinity of the primary race, with each candidate questioning his opponent’s Republican good faith.

DiCianni points to Hart contributors who are tied to Chicago’s Democratic power structure, such as business owner Fred Barbara, whose companies worked in the city’s notorious Hired Truck program, developer Elzie Higginbottom and the former president of Chicago Public Schools, Gery Chico.

Hart, meanwhile, sheds light on the work a DiCianni-owned printing and campaign marketing company has done for Democratic candidates and political groups. They include the Coalition for Better Government, a group associated with the Daley machine whose treasurer, Dominic Longo, was once found guilty of electoral fraud, and state Rep. Deb Conroy, the Democratic nominee for board chair (DiCianni printed $822 worth of T-shirts in 2018 for Conroy, whom he calls a friend).

DiCianni said that while his work for Democrats is just business, it shows he can cross party lines. Hart gave a similar response about his campaign contributions, although he said there was a difference between accepting a donation and working for a candidate.

“Pete DiCianni’s business choices show the direction in which he would lead our community,” he said.

Whoever wins on June 28 will likely face a tough challenge from Conroy in the general election, which could prove to be a signal about the county’s political future.

That’s because DuPage County, long known as one of the most Republican jurisdictions in the nation, has seen Democrats take control in recent years. They now hold all of the county’s congressional seats, most state legislative offices, and a majority of the 18 county council seats.

But Melissa Mouritsen, a political science professor at the College of DuPage, thinks the board could once again be up for grabs.

“Governing is different from just winning,” she said. “Now that (the Democrats) are governing, they don’t seem to be able to craft policy the way they promised to. There were a lot of fights, a lot of disagreements, a lot of rookie mistakes. … They’re going to have to answer for that, and I think it’s going to be a close race.

Hart, 34, is a management consultant in Hinsdale. With less than five years in elected office, he has a shorter political resume than DiCianni, but he remains the choice of the county’s Republican establishment: sheriff, coroner and current chairman of the board. all approved.

“He has excellent people skills and is a hard worker,” said Dan Cronin, who is stepping down as chairman after 12 years in the role. “I feel really good with him. He’s the future of DuPage County.

Hart was named to the board of directors in 2017 and won his first election in 2018. He said his main accomplishments were to shore up county psychiatric services, help create a small business loan program, and to lead the HOPE task force, formed to fight the county’s opioids. crisis.

“We have successfully created programs that have connected people to expanded treatment, expanded the availability of Narcan to save lives and reverse overdoses, and connected people with employment opportunities who are successful in addiction treatment” , did he declare.

If elected to the top job, he said, he wants to keep taxes flat, make it easier for businesses owned by women, minorities and veterans to do business with the county and s ensure the sheriff and state’s attorney get what they need to fight growing crime. .

DiCianni, 55, is a former mayor of Elmhurst who helped pass several state laws, including a measure that requires insurers to cover autism treatment and another that allows police to track people with cognitive impairment thanks to GPS bracelets in case of disappearance.

He said he was asked to run for county council in 2012 after flooding problems in Elmhurst convinced him a higher office could more effectively address the problem. He originally intended to keep his post as mayor while serving on the board, but gave up the job after a firestorm of criticism.

He said he was proud to have won federal funds for stormwater relief and to push for a state law, prompted by the death of an Elmhurst teenager, that allows first responders to carry epinephrine auto-injectors to treat anaphylactic shock.

He wants to pursue such selfless work as county chairman — “Unlike a lot of Republicans, I have a huge heart,” he said — while controlling taxes, spurring economic development and s ensuring that the sheriff’s office has an adequate budget.

Public safety is a central campaign issue, with both candidates pointing to the Dec. 23, 2021 shooting at the Oakbrook Center mall, for which two Chicago men have been charged, as a warning that crime in big cities is encroaching. on the county. .

DiCianni cites his 2017 vote against cutting sheriff’s office positions as proof of his dedication. Hart, along with the majority of his colleagues, voted for the measure.

“If I’m president, I’ll fully fund the budget, get the head count back to where it should be, and make sure we keep our county safe,” DiCianni said.

Hart responded that the vote was about fiscal responsibility after former sheriff John Zaruba chose not to fill some budgeted positions. Current Sheriff James Mendrick supports Hart, calling him a staunch and effective advocate for law enforcement.

Mendrick added that DeCianni “has a harder ability to get along with people. He’s definitely more aggressive and I don’t necessarily think that’s always a good thing.

That sharp edge was evident two years ago when DiCianni confronted people protesting a pro-police rally in Elmhurst, then sent a rude email to a resident criticizing him. He apologized and resigned under pressure as chairman of the council’s health and social care committee.

DiCianni told the Tribune that he wasn’t “perfect in my response,” but made no apologies for supporting his hometown police force.

“We have to move on and hopefully a slight indiscretion doesn’t affect all the good that Pete DiCianni has done,” he said.

One of his backers, Woodridge Mayor Gina Cunningham, put a positive spin on his temper.

“I really think I found someone passionate in Pete, and I can’t question someone’s passion,” she said. “…I just know the great works that Pete has done and continues to do.

jkeilman@chicagotribune.com

Twitter @JohnKeilman

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Intrommune Therapeutics Appoints Nandini Murthy as Chief Regulatory Officer | Your money https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/intrommune-therapeutics-appoints-nandini-murthy-as-chief-regulatory-officer-your-money/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 17:33:00 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/intrommune-therapeutics-appoints-nandini-murthy-as-chief-regulatory-officer-your-money/ NEW YORK, June 01, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Intrommune Therapeutics, Inc., a New York-based clinical-stage biotechnology company developing a patient-friendly treatment platform for peanut and other food allergies, announced the arrival of Nandini Murthy as Chief Regulatory Officer. “Ms. Murthy has proven to be an invaluable asset to Intrommune since joining the organization as a […]]]>

NEW YORK, June 01, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Intrommune Therapeutics, Inc., a New York-based clinical-stage biotechnology company developing a patient-friendly treatment platform for peanut and other food allergies, announced the arrival of Nandini Murthy as Chief Regulatory Officer.

“Ms. Murthy has proven to be an invaluable asset to Intrommune since joining the organization as a consultant working with our regulatory and clinical development teams,” said Michael Nelson, CEO of Intrommune Therapeutics. Mrs. Murthy’s agreement to join our leadership team as Chief Regulatory Officer demonstrates his commitment to helping food allergy patients live better lives and his expertise in regulatory, clinical and quality affairs is a valuable addition to Intrommune as we move forward with our patient-friendly treatment. peanut allergy, INT301 and our food allergy follow-up products. »

The Company’s Oral Mucosal Immunotherapy (OMIT) platform is based on the well accepted principles of allergic immunotherapy. The company’s initial product, INT301, is an immunotherapy treatment for peanut allergy delivered via a specially formulated toothpaste designed to optimize the exposure of allergenic proteins to a patient’s immune system while cleaning their teeth. Intrommune is currently recruiting patients for its OMEGA INT301 Phase 1 clinical trial.

Ms. Murthy joins Intrommune with significant strategic and operational experience in regulatory affairs, clinical and quality assurance functions. Over the past 25+ years, in full-time or consulting roles, she has led numerous successful submissions to the FDA for new clearances or approvals for combinations and devices. As the founder of a life sciences consulting company, ENEM Consulting LLC, her successful track record in new therapeutics and diagnostics regulatory projects includes drug delivery systems and GRAS pharmaceutical/botanicals .

“I am honored to work on this novel food allergy treatment platform in hopes that these products will help food allergy patients live a better life,” said Nandini Murthy, Chief Regulatory Officer at Intrommune.

About Peanut and Other Food Allergies Food allergies affect more than 220 million people worldwide, including about 32 million people in the United States. food products and therefore difficult to avoid. Many people with peanut allergies are accidentally exposed and experience life-threatening reactions, including anaphylaxis, every year. Unfortunately, food allergy remains an area of ​​enormous unmet medical need.

About Oral Mucosal Immunotherapy™ Oral Mucosal Immunotherapy (OMIT) uses a specially formulated toothpaste to stabilize and deliver allergenic proteins to immunologically active areas of the oral cavity with the greatest potential for allergy desensitization . The success of allergy immunotherapy relies on constant exposure of a patient’s immune system to gradually “desensitize” the patient to the specific allergy trigger over time. OMIT has advantages over other approaches to allergy immunotherapy due to its targeted delivery and simplified administration, which supports the potential for improved adherence.

About Intrommune Therapeutics intracommunity, dedicated to improving and protecting the lives of food allergy sufferers, is developing the breakthrough Oral Mucosal Immunotherapy (OMIT) treatment platform for food allergies. OMIT is a patient-friendly solution for more than 220 million people worldwide, including 32 million people in the United States, who suffer from life-changing food allergies. Intrommune Therapeutic’s lead product, INT301, has entered Phase 1 clinical trials. All Phase 1 results and future studies are intended to support OMIT as a safe, effective and practical therapy for patients suffering from peanut allergy.

For more information about Intrommune Therapeutics, please visit http://www.intrommune.com

Contact: Stuart Loesch Intrommune Therapeutics (267) 740-2905 sloesch@intrommune.com

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