Allergic Asthma – Parents Of Allergic Children http://parentsofallergicchildren.org/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 09:45:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-5.png Allergic Asthma – Parents Of Allergic Children http://parentsofallergicchildren.org/ 32 32 Why Some Summer Fruits Make Your Tongue Itchy, Even If You’re Not Allergic https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/why-some-summer-fruits-make-your-tongue-itchy-even-if-youre-not-allergic/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 09:45:01 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/why-some-summer-fruits-make-your-tongue-itchy-even-if-youre-not-allergic/ (Photo: istetiana via Getty Images) (Photo: istetiana via Getty Images) It’s probably happened to you: You take a bite of an apple, kiwi, or berry and suddenly feel itchy around your mouth, even though you’re pretty sure you’re not allergic to the fruit you just ate. Why does this happen? Experts call this phenomenon oral […]]]>

(Photo: istetiana via Getty Images)

(Photo: istetiana via Getty Images)

It’s probably happened to you: You take a bite of an apple, kiwi, or berry and suddenly feel itchy around your mouth, even though you’re pretty sure you’re not allergic to the fruit you just ate. Why does this happen?

Experts call this phenomenon oral allergy syndrome (OAS), also known as pollen fruit syndrome (PFT). Indisposition is quite common and is the result of cross-reactivity. To put it simply: your body recognizes the proteins in the fresh fruits you have just eaten as similar to those present in the pollen, to which you are in fact allergic.

What is Oral Allergy Syndrome?

According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, OAS is “a form of contact allergic reaction that occurs when the mouth and throat come in contact with raw fruits and vegetables.” The most common symptoms, which usually occur immediately after ingestion, are “itching or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue and throat”.

“It is usually a reaction to fresh fruits, nuts or vegetables that develops in patients with hay fever, which is an allergy to tree, grass or wheat pollens,” explained the Dr. Svetlana Kriegel, certified allergist at the University of Toledo. College of Medicine and Life Sciences and Medical Center of the University of Toledo. “About 15% of patients have a reaction to fresh fruits and vegetables because the immune system confuses the protein in the fruit with the protein in the pollen.” Your body literally thinks you just ingested the type of pollen you are allergic to.

“When it comes to ‘true’ food allergies, there are over 180 foods known to cause them, and some of them are fruits and nuts,” explained Dr. Katie Marks-Cogan, lead allergist for On your marks, get set, food! “But when talking about these foods specifically, the reaction is usually caused by cross-reactivity and this syndrome.”

The most common pollen allergies associated with ODS are birches, grass and certain types of wheat, the expert noted.

What are cross reactors?

Broadly speaking, there are four categories of environmental allergens that interact with the types of fruits, vegetables, and nuts that cause allergy-like reactions.

This chart from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology is extremely helpful in tracking foods that cause reactions.

Just as certain fruits are in season at specific times of the year, certain types of pollen are more important in certain months. That is to say, the reaction that many people associate with summer fruits is not relegated to this season, but simply indicates a sensitivity to a type of pollen. Some people experience allergy-like symptoms during the winter, spring, and fall as well as after ingesting foods that are not important during the summer months.

What are the symptoms of oral allergy syndrome?

There are a few important things to keep in mind when analyzing VS symptoms.

Cooking fruits changes their composition, often making them less likely to trigger a reaction.  (Photo: David Bishop Inc. via Getty Images)

Cooking fruits changes their composition, often making them less likely to trigger a reaction. (Photo: David Bishop Inc. via Getty Images)

Cooking fruits changes their composition, often making them less likely to trigger a reaction. (Photo: David Bishop Inc. via Getty Images)

First, the symptoms are usually relegated to the mouth. “As we digest fruits, vegetables, and nuts, the protein breaks down in our system and it no longer appears to be where it caused the reaction,” Marks-Cogan explained. As a result, the most common symptoms involve itching, tingling and possibly burning of the mouth, lips and throat. Sometimes, however, runny eyes and nose and sneezing can occur.

If you have an anaphylactic-like reaction to eating any of these foods, you may actually be allergic to the fruits, vegetables, or nuts themselves, not just display a cross-reactive sensitivity to their pollen.

Is there a way to prevent a reaction?

The easiest way to avoid having a reaction to any of these fruits, vegetables, and nuts, of course, is to avoid eating them entirely. Cooking them or maybe even microwaving them for a few seconds can also help you avoid symptoms.

Interestingly enough, the reactions don’t usually occur when people consume the food in an unraw state, such as canned or cooked. Indeed, cooking fruits, vegetables and nuts actually changes their protein composition and the immune system will no longer associate said protein with various other allergens. So if you’re sensitive to raw peaches, for example, you might not experience the same symptoms when eating baked peach pie.

“All of these allergens are affected by heat,” Kriegel explained. “You can’t eat fresh apples, but you can have apple jam, for example. You can’t have apricot, but you can have apricot jam. This is because once cooked, its configuration changes.

Eaters should also keep in mind that the main allergens are found in the skin and the very core (next to the seeds) of fruits, vegetables or nuts, according to Kriegel. Not eating those specific parts of the fruit could also ease the discomfort.

The most discussed treatment is allergen immunotherapy, which basically involves getting regular allergy shots. Once you recognize the fruits or vegetables you are having a reaction to, you can do a skin test to check your pollen sensitization. The bites will then desensitize your body to allergens in the environment, hopefully teaching your immune system not to react to them.

“Once you stop reacting to pollen, your sensitivity to fruits and vegetables also decreases,” Kriegel said. “We use the pollen extract for the injections so that the body tolerates the exposure to the protein without causing a reaction. The body will then say, ‘I already have so much pollen in my body, why have a reaction when I encounter more when eating, say, a cucumber or an apple?

It has not been proven effective to “overcome” the syndrome by simply eating more fruits, nuts and vegetables that cause a reaction instead of following therapy.

“There was anecdotal evidence,” Marks-Cogan conceded. “But, as adults, it’s hard to know how much extract your body needs to get used to it.” With small children the immune system is formed and therefore we advise exposure to possible allergens, but when you are older it is more difficult to determine.

What should we do after the reaction?

Since these aren’t “real food allergies,” as experts have noted, symptoms usually go away on their own within minutes. That being said, taking an antihistamine (Benadryl, for example) will help soothe any kind of itching or burning relatively quickly.

Overall, doctors recommend awareness. After determining what type of fruits, vegetables, and nuts cause a reaction, consider doing a skin test to find out what pollen you are actually allergic to.

This article originally appeared on HuffPost and has been updated.

Related…

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Vicki Lyons, MD is recognized by Continental Who’s Who https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/vicki-lyons-md-is-recognized-by-continental-whos-who/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 20:40:00 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/vicki-lyons-md-is-recognized-by-continental-whos-who/ Ogden, Utah, June 20, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Vicki LyonsMD, is recognized by Continental Who’s Who as a Distinguished Woman in Health Care for her outstanding achievements as an allergist and immunologist and in recognition of her practice, Advanced Allergy & Asthma. Vicki Lyons A board-certified allergist and internal physician with 28 years of expertise, Dr. […]]]>

Ogden, Utah, June 20, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Vicki LyonsMD, is recognized by Continental Who’s Who as a Distinguished Woman in Health Care for her outstanding achievements as an allergist and immunologist and in recognition of her practice, Advanced Allergy & Asthma.

A board-certified allergist and internal physician with 28 years of expertise, Dr. Lyons serves the Ogden, UT field, helping patients of all ages effectively manage their chronic allergy and asthma issues. At his Advanced Allergy & Asthma medical practice, Dr. Lyons and his two physician partners are well known for their high quality patient care, providing the most advanced asthma and allergy therapies available.

Highly skilled in the diagnosis and treatment of seasonal allergies, food allergies, eczema and asthma, Dr. Lyons prides herself on taking a patient-centered approach to both short and long-term care plans. term. She works closely with her patients, taking the time to address their questions and concerns in depth.

In honor of her excellence in her field, Dr. Lyons was named one of the region’s top allergy and immunologists by The Leading Physicians of the World.

Dr. Lyons received her medical degree from Louisiana State University School of Medicine New Orleans to pursue his career. She completed her residency in internal medicine at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center and completed a fellowship in allergy and immunology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. During his medical training, Dr. Lyons received the prestigious Presidential Merit Scholarship and was selected for a National Institute of Health Study Fellowship.

Due to her extensive training, Dr. Lyons is certified by the American Board of Allergy and Immunology.

Along with his private practice, Dr. Lyons is a Section Head in the Department of Allergy and Immunology at McKay Dee Hospital. She previously served as president of the Utah Chapter of the American Lung Association and the Utah Society of Allergy and Asthma.

In addition to her clinical work, Dr. Lyons has served as principal investigator for more than 130 FDA-funded research studies involving various diseases and drugs. The doctor is also the author of a host of scholarly works related to asthma medication allergies and immunotherapy. She also co-founded an online publication called What Doctors Know.

On a personal note, Dr. Lyons enjoys participating in outdoor activities such as hiking, biking, and skiing outside of her medical work. She also owns horses and enjoys riding and caring for them in her spare time.

Dr. Lyons and two of her brothers decided to pursue a career in medicine. In 2010, she decided to honor their father’s memory by founding the John W. Porter Family Charitable Foundation.

For more information, visit www.allergyasthma.clinic.

CONTACT: Katherine Green516-825-5634, [email protected]

SOURCE Continental Who’s Who

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Excessive prices on infant formula? WA Senators Murray and Cantwell call for investigation | Washington https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/excessive-prices-on-infant-formula-wa-senators-murray-and-cantwell-call-for-investigation-washington/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/excessive-prices-on-infant-formula-wa-senators-murray-and-cantwell-call-for-investigation-washington/ The U.S. Food and Drug Administration must investigate whether national retail chains and online vendors have raised prices for specialty infant formula during the current shortage, says Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash. “No one should take advantage of the baby formula shortage, especially the big retail chains,” Murray said. “This is a critical time when the […]]]>

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration must investigate whether national retail chains and online vendors have raised prices for specialty infant formula during the current shortage, says Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash.

“No one should take advantage of the baby formula shortage, especially the big retail chains,” Murray said. “This is a critical time when the federal government must crack down on any price increases during this crisis.”

It led other senators to send a letter Tuesday to Lina Khan, chairwoman of the Federal Trade Commission, asking that staff investigate unfair trade practices at national retail chains.

Murray is joined on the letter by Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., who is the chair of the Senate Commerce Committee, which oversees the FTC.

“It’s my job to be a voice for parents from Washington State to Richland, or anywhere else, who need to be heard in Congress – and no parent desperate to feed their baby should see higher prices for her baby’s formula because a company is trying to increase profits,” Murray said in a commentary to the Tri-City Herald.

Parents in the Tri-Cities area continue to have to research the different types of infant formula that are best for their baby.

There were 28 posts in the 24 hours of mid-morning Tuesday on the Tri-Cities Find My Formula Facebook page sharing advice on where formula was and was not available, asking for help locating specific formulas and warn of a scammer.

Increase in the price of formulas

“I just opened my last box of formula,” one adoptive mom posted. She said she couldn’t find the brand and formula her foster baby tolerates best, Nutramigen, and posted a photo of the rash on the little girl’s face when she tried a hypoallergenic formula different.

Another mother posted that she had a canister to spare the adoptive mother as she planned to drive to Spokane in search of more.

Nutramigen, which is designed for babies with cow’s milk allergy and those who may develop eczema or asthma, is one of the hardest formulas to find right now, Richland’s Mac Jaehnert said.

He administers the local Find My Formula Facebook page after struggling to find a specialist supplement that his daughter was born into prematurely.

He says a Tri-Cities Rite Aid has raised their price for Nutramigen over the past 18 months from $33 or $34 to $44.

“It’s a really big leap,” he said.

He also checked Target, which had a lower price, but no canisters on the shelf, he said.

Rite Aid is one of the few stores in the Tri-Cities to have Nutramigen in stock, but parents who still find it may leave the store empty-handed, he said.

Not only are prices rising, but Rite Aid is not accepting payments from the Washington State Women’s, Infants, and Children’s Nutrition Program, or WIC, leaving parents to pay $44 out of pocket, it said. -he declares.

Rite Aid did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Specialized formulas are a problem

Murray and other senators have received similar reports that some large retail chains and online secondary markets have dramatically raised prices for specialty formula products.

“A major retailer appears to have increased its price for at least one specialty formula by more than 33% between October 2020 and May 2022,” the letter to the FTC chairwoman said.

Parents and guardians report that when they find online vendors with a specialized formula, they sometimes make more than double the cost in-store.

Among the babies who need specialized formulas are those who are allergic to milk and infants born prematurely, who need specific formulas to help them develop.

“At a time when families are already grappling with inflation, these practices harm children and their families when they are most vulnerable,” the letter said. “They need to be studied and reduced.”

Murray and other senators signing the letter are asking the FTC to work with state attorneys general, including Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson, to ensure companies that inflate prices for specialty formula products are held responsible.

Murray has previously lobbied the Food and Drug Administration for its belated response to concerns about Abbott Nutrition’s Michigan facility.

A whistleblower notified the FDA of problems at the Abbott plant in October, but the FDA did not inspect the plant until January 31. And on February 17, the formula was recalled.

Over the past few weeks, Murray has worked with Sen. Bob Casey, D-Penn., to push manufacturers to produce more formulas and to ask the Biden administration to appoint a formula coordinator to lead a national strategy.

Murray also chaired a hearing on the infant formula crisis, questioning FDA Commissioner Robert Califf about his agency’s response to the crisis.

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Cost of living crisis sparks ‘death sentence’ fears for asthmatics https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/cost-of-living-crisis-sparks-death-sentence-fears-for-asthmatics/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/cost-of-living-crisis-sparks-death-sentence-fears-for-asthmatics/ Cost of living crisis sparks ‘death sentence’ fears for asthmatics Calendar An icon of a desktop calendar. to cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across it. Caret A right-pointing solid arrow icon. E-mail An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of Facebook’s “f” mark. Google An icon of Google’s […]]]>




Cost of living crisis sparks ‘death sentence’ fears for asthmatics



































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“Grief is a subject I wish I had known about earlier” https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/grief-is-a-subject-i-wish-i-had-known-about-earlier/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 14:04:13 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/grief-is-a-subject-i-wish-i-had-known-about-earlier/ Weekend Breakfast’s Gugs Mhlungu spoke to Adulting 101 author Jen Thorpe about her book on coming of age. Weekend Breakfast’s Gugs Mhlungu spoke about Jen Thorpe – the author of Adulting 101 which is a book to help you navigate the tricky terrain of adulthood. Thorpe walks you through everything you need to know about […]]]>

Weekend Breakfast’s Gugs Mhlungu spoke to Adulting 101 author Jen Thorpe about her book on coming of age.

Weekend Breakfast’s Gugs Mhlungu spoke about Jen Thorpe – the author of Adulting 101 which is a book to help you navigate the tricky terrain of adulthood.

Thorpe walks you through everything you need to know about relationships, sex, work, health and money, to how government and the media work.

“It’s a book that will help with some of the things we all have to do, the boring parts of adulthood, but only learn the hard way.”

Jen Thorpe – author of Adulting 101

Thorpe also addresses grief – which many adults find difficult to deal with, whether it’s personal grief or that of a friend or colleague. As one listener put it, “Grieving is something I wish I had known about sooner.”

Although Thorpe acknowledges the complexity of grief, she makes suggestions in her book for how people can generally handle their own and others’.

“It’s not a video game where you go from one level to another and you finally complete it…grief is not linear. It jumps around and some days you can be in denial and other days you may be angry or sad…other days you may try to negotiate with him…”

Jen Thorpe – author of Adulting 101

You can listen to their conversation below:

This article first appeared on EWN: “Grief is a subject I wish I had known about sooner” – Adulting 101

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Unique set of genes linked to obesity-linked asthma in young people https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/unique-set-of-genes-linked-to-obesity-linked-asthma-in-young-people/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 14:06:07 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/unique-set-of-genes-linked-to-obesity-linked-asthma-in-young-people/ Source/Disclosures Disclosures: Xu does not report any relevant financial information. Please see the study for relevant financial information from all other authors. ADD A SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALERTS Receive an email when new articles are published on Please provide your email address to receive an email when new articles […]]]>


Source/Disclosures


Disclosures: Xu does not report any relevant financial information. Please see the study for relevant financial information from all other authors.


We have not been able to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

According to a study published in Pediatric allergy and immunology.

Zhongli Xu, an MD-PhD candidate at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and a visiting scholar at the University of Pittsburgh, and colleagues wrote that obesity-related asthma is increasingly recognized as a phenotype distinct asthma with more severe severity and reduced response to bronchodilators and inhaled corticosteroids.



Source: Adobe Stock

“Gene expression in the nasal epithelium correlates strongly with that of the bronchial epithelium, and thus nasal airway epithelium may serve as a surrogate marker for transcriptomics in the lower airway,” Xu wrote. and colleagues, adding that most previous studies have focused on blood. biomarkers.

To identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and pathways associated with obesity-related asthma, researchers conducted a transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS) in the nasal airway epithelium in young people at high risk of overweight or obesity and asthma.

The analysis included data from 235 Puerto Rican adolescents ages 9 to 20 from the Epigenetic Variation and Childhood Asthma Study and 66 children ages 6 to 16 from Pittsburgh in the Vitamin D Kids Asthma Study. Both studies included cohorts of overweight or obese with asthma (OOA) and normal weight with asthma (NWA) children.

The results of the transcriptome-wide meta-analysis revealed 29 DEG among young people with OOA, including CXCL11, CXCL10, CXCL9, CCL8, ISG15, £5, GBP1, SOCS1, GZMB, IFI35 and ISG20. None of these were significantly correlated with overweight or obesity in non-asthmatic children.

Moreover, only five of the 29 DEG – CXCL11, CCL8, LILRB1, SOCS1 and GZMB — appeared to be associated with overweight or obesity in young people without asthma.

Data from a functional enrichment analysis showed that the top 10 gene ontology biological processes overrepresented for the 29 DEGs associated with OOA included interferon-gamma production and the interferon signaling pathway of type I, T-cell and neutrophil chemotaxis and chemokine-mediated signaling pathways. Overall, most up-regulated pathways in OOA were those related to ciliary structure or function, while down-regulated pathways in OOA were those related to ciliary signaling. interferon, innate immune responses and adaptive immune response pathways.

Gene network analysis results revealed £5 as a “hub” gene unique to OOA; ISG15, SPATS2L and IFI25 as hub genes unique to NWA; and SOC21 as a central gene shared by OOA and NWA. The researchers also identified some co-expression patterns, such as the significantly higher co-expression of CXCL9 and VSXCL10 in OOA compared to NWA.

“We assume that increasing regulation CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 adipose tissue could induce a systemic response to low-grade interferon; this, combined with asthma-related interferon-mediated responses, could cause inhibited expression of CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 in the airways of OOA – which in turn may contribute to an impaired response to respiratory viral infections in patients with OOA,” the researchers wrote, adding that these findings warrant further study for the development of biomarkers or therapies.

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Titans WR coach previews Treylon Burks’ early struggles to stay on the training ground https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/titans-wr-coach-previews-treylon-burks-early-struggles-to-stay-on-the-training-ground/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 01:03:15 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/titans-wr-coach-previews-treylon-burks-early-struggles-to-stay-on-the-training-ground/ George Walker IV / Tennessean.com / USA TODAY NETWORK There’s been a shadow over the Tennessee Titans’ OTAs, as first-round wide receiver Treylon Burks has been on and off the practice field since first donning a helmet for rookie minicamp. It seemed to have something to do with conditioning, but was he out of shape? […]]]>
treylon-burks.jpg
George Walker IV / Tennessean.com / USA TODAY NETWORK

There’s been a shadow over the Tennessee Titans’ OTAs, as first-round wide receiver Treylon Burks has been on and off the practice field since first donning a helmet for rookie minicamp. It seemed to have something to do with conditioning, but was he out of shape? Did he have any allergies or something that was affecting his breathing? This is a question that every journalist wanted to know the answer to.

When Burks spoke to reporters just a week ago, he was pretty quiet on the subject. Asked about his level of conditioning, he responded by saying he “differs from time to time”. Burks had also been seen with an inhaler, but said he would keep his reasoning behind him “internally”. The rookie even told reporters to ask head coach Mike Vrabel if they wanted more details, but Vrabel declined to comment when asked.

On Tuesday, the NFL world finally got some clarity on what the former Arkansas star was going through, and it came via receivers coach Rob Moore.

“Some of the things that happened were kind of out of his control,” Moore said, via ESPN’s Turron Davenport. “The kid has asthma. These things happen. But he understands what the expectations are, but I think at the end of the day it’s really him immersing himself in the culture of how we do things. here, how we play here, which is different from every player that comes here from college because we ask these guys to do things that a lot of teams don’t ask them to do.

“I’m excited about Treylon and what he’s going to be able to bring to this football team. He just has to be healthy and be able to show everyone here on the pitch what he’s capable of.”

Burks isn’t the first professional athlete or NFL player to deal with asthma, but the franchise’s handling of the issue has made him arguably the Titans OTA’s mainstay. Vrabel said Tuesday the Titans were aware of his asthma before the draft. It’s something that will continue to be discussed, as Burks also missed Tuesday’s training session, with Vrabel simply saying he was ‘unavailable’.

There’s also a lot of pressure on young Burks, as he was drafted moments after Tennessee sent AJ Brown to the Philadelphia Eagles. If the Titans want to repeat as the No. 1 seed in the AFC or AFC South champions, Burks will have to be an immediate contributor.

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Asthma (teenagers) – Channel3000.com https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/asthma-teenagers-channel3000-com/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/asthma-teenagers-channel3000-com/ June 4, 2022 3:00 p.m. chris woolston Job : June 4, 2022 3:00 p.m. Updated: June 6, 2022 01:10 What is asthma? Most people associate asthma with sudden bouts of coughing and wheezing, but the condition is actually present 24 hours a day. If your teen has asthma, the tubes that carry air to their […]]]>

What is asthma?

Most people associate asthma with sudden bouts of coughing and wheezing, but the condition is actually present 24 hours a day. If your teen has asthma, the tubes that carry air to their lungs are inflamed and may be swollen and clogged with mucus. This condition may not interfere with his breathing, but it does set the stage for asthma attacks. Her inflamed airways are extremely sensitive, and something as harmless as dust, cold air, or exercise can cause the muscles lining the airways to suddenly contract, leaving little room for air to pass. .

How do I know if my teenager has asthma?

Asthma symptoms can mimic those of pneumonia, bronchitis, allergies, or even a cold, so it’s not always clear cut. Wheezing and coughing (especially at night) are the most common symptoms of an asthma attack, but other signs – chest tightness or shortness of breath – are also signs of asthma.

If your teen’s symptoms keep him up at night or interfere with his normal activities, he may have asthma. You should have a doctor examine your child to determine whether or not they have it and, if so, how badly the disease is affecting their lungs. Remember that many teenagers with asthma also suffer from allergies. If your teen has hay fever or other allergic reactions, take any signs of asthma seriously. Also, since colds and other respiratory infections often lead to attacks, you should suspect asthma if your teen continues to cough long after the illness has subsided.

What can I do to prevent attacks?

Try to protect your teen from the allergies and irritants that often trigger seizures. No family member should ever smoke in the house and urge your teen to never smoke. she should also avoid breathing second-hand smoke. Vacuum your floors regularly, clean her bedroom of major dust traps such as potted plants, rugs and carpets, and get bedding made from non-allergenic materials. If she is allergic to your pets, ask your allergist for advice. During this time, keep them outside or at least out of his room. (Washing your pet regularly is also effective.) If he only has asthma attacks in the spring and fall, try to limit his exposure to pollen – the likely culprit of seasonal allergies – by keeping the windows closed and installing filters in your air conditioner. When he goes outside in cold weather, remind him to breathe through his nose and offer to cover his mouth with a scarf.

Doctors have long believed that strong emotions can trigger an asthma attack, and a study from the University at Buffalo in New York supports this theory. Research has found that young people have nearly twice the incidence of depression compared to their non-asthmatic peers and that depression can increase their asthma symptoms. Additionally, another study found that children facing threats such as street violence were twice as likely to have asthma symptoms as other children. For these reasons, some psychologists recommend suggesting that your child go for a counseling appointment if he seems depressed or under a lot of stress.

Can my teen still exercise and play sports?

Absolutely. Many Olympic athletes and top professionals suffer from asthma, and there’s no reason why your teen shouldn’t play their favorite sports. If she is prone to seizures during exercise, she may need to use her inhaler just before working out. Swimming is a great form of exercise for anyone with asthma because the warm, moist air around a heated pool makes it easier to breathe. Sports that require constant movement, such as soccer, can be especially difficult, but your teen can almost certainly find a way to stay in the game. She should always have her inhaler handy, in case she needs it.

How is asthma treated?

Doctors use two types of drugs: one that reduces inflammation (a “controller”) and one that opens the airways (a “reliever”).

Corticosteroids and similar medications — which are either inhaled, injected, or taken as pills — can lessen your teen’s inflamed airways and make them less likely to have seizures. Bronchodilators, which are spray medications usually taken using an inhaler, can make breathing easier by relaxing the muscles that are constricting the airways during an asthma attack. If your child is still having trouble breathing after using the inhaler more than twice, call 911 or take them to the emergency room immediately.

An asthma diary and a peak flow meter — an instrument that measures the quality of your child’s breathing — can also be important parts of the treatment plan. By regularly using the peak flow meter to measure the strength of their breathing and tracking the number and severity of their attacks in a diary, your teen can give their doctor information to gauge the effectiveness of treatments. Recording what she was doing or feeling just before an asthma attack also helps her identify triggers to avoid. Based on this knowledge, the doctor might change your teen’s medications to give her better control over the disease.

How can I encourage my teen to take their medication?

Even if your teen has had asthma since elementary school, they may suddenly find it difficult to stick to their medication. Indeed, one study found that even though children and adolescents underused long-term controller medications across all domains, adolescents were 20% more likely to show signs of inadequate asthma control than children. younger. Fearing being teased or ridiculed, many teens try to keep their condition a secret, which often means going without their inhalers or pills.

When left untreated in this way, the disease can get worse, leading to permanent lung damage or even a life-threatening stroke. Tell your teen that medication can help him lead a normal life filled with sports and socializing, if he doesn’t try to keep his asthma to himself. Instead, she should tell all of her friends and teachers about the disease so that they are supportive and less likely to panic during an attack.

The good news is that by taking an active role in asthma management, your teen can lead a full life.

Other Resources

The American Lung Association, (800) 586-4812 or http://www.lungusa.org, has more tips to help you and your teen cope.

The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, (800) 727-8462, offers referrals to books, pamphlets, videos, and local support groups.

References

Science News, stress and depression make childhood asthma worse, researchers show. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/0907…

Miller BD, Wood BL. Influence of specific emotional states on autonomic reactivity and lung function in children with asthma. : J Am Acad Child Adolescent Psychiatry; 36(5):669-77. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9136502

Lozano P et al. Asthma medication use and disease burden in children in a primary care population. Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. 157(1):81-8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12517200

Wood BL, Lim J, Miller BD et al. Family and emotional climate, depression, emotional onset of asthma, and disease severity in pediatric asthma: review of pathways. Journal of Pediatric Psychology;32(5):542-51. http://jpepsy.oxfordjournals.org/content/32/5/542….

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People with certain allergies are 50% less likely to get COVID: study https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/people-with-certain-allergies-are-50-less-likely-to-get-covid-study/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 18:31:31 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/people-with-certain-allergies-are-50-less-likely-to-get-covid-study/ Food allergies are actually a good thing when it comes to the risk of contracting COVID-19, according to a new study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The Human Epidemiology and Response to SARS-CoV-2 (HEROS) study was published in May in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and reported that self-reported, doctor-diagnosed […]]]>

Food allergies are actually a good thing when it comes to the risk of contracting COVID-19, according to a new study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The Human Epidemiology and Response to SARS-CoV-2 (HEROS) study was published in May in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and reported that self-reported, doctor-diagnosed food allergy was associated with a 50% lower risk of infection.

The original intent of the study was to determine whether self-reported asthma and/or other allergic diseases are associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection and household transmission. Physician-diagnosed asthma was not reported to be a risk factor for infection, nor was allergy or upper respiratory eczema.

… Furthermore, the observed association between food allergy and risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection, as well as between body mass index and this risk, deserves further investigation.

NIH

“The results of the HEROS study underscore the importance of vaccinating children and implementing other public health measures to prevent them from becoming infected with SARS-CoV-2, thereby protecting both children and vulnerable members of their household from the virus,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), which is part of the NIH, said in a statement. “Furthermore, the observed association between food allergy and risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection, as well as between body mass index and this risk, merits further investigation.”

People walk past a COVID-19 testing site on May 17 in New York when New York City Health Commissioner Dr Ashwin Vasan raised the alert level from “medium” to “high” within five boroughs. A recent National Institutes of Health study found that food allergies reduced the risk of COVID by 50%.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

NIAID sponsored and funded the HEROS study.

The study tracked COVID-19 infection in more than 4,000 people in about 1,400 households that included at least one person aged 21 or younger. Individuals were tracked between May 2020 and February 2021 in 12 cities across the United States, before the vaccines were rolled out to the general public.

A caregiver from each household took nasal swabs from participants every two weeks to test for COVID-19, involving the completion of weekly surveys. If the symptoms were consistent with COVID-19, additional samples were required. Blood samples were also taken periodically if necessary.

The NIH said study participants were recruited from existing NIH-funded studies focused on allergic disease, including nearly 50 percent of child, adolescent, and adult participants who had a food allergy, asthma, eczema or allergic rhinitis.

Dr. Max Seibold is a professor of pediatrics at the Center for Genes, Environment, and Health at National Jewish Health in Denver, Colorado. He said Newsweek NIAID contacted him in March 2020 to help with the study.

“There was a lot of uncertainty around the risk to people with asthma, as well as the susceptibility of children with asthma and how transmission might work within families,” Seibold said.

There was a lot of uncertainty about the risk to people with asthma, as well as the susceptibility of children with asthma and how transmission might work within families.

Dr. Max Seibold

As an NIH-funded researcher, Seibold said he already had cohorts of children with asthma or allergies. He and other subjects re-recruited into the HEROS study to undergo surveillance for approximately seven months.

His lab, the Seibold Lab, does a lot of airway transcriptomics that includes nasal swabs to better understand the airways of asthma. His laboratory was contacted to treat and test COVID-19, carrying out epidemiological analyzes of the data generated, involving the performance of several studies on viral infections.

“It’s not a finding that we necessarily expected, or at this point we have the answer to observational ideology,” Seibold said of the link between food allergies and an increased risk rate. greatly reduced infection.

He said a 2020 study looked at inflammation patterns and the nasal airways of children, finding that those with higher inflammation – or type 2 inflammation – expressed lower levels of a receptor gene. ACE2 which regularly binds and enters cells to trigger infection.

Dr. Tina Hartert, director of the Center for Asthma and Environmental Sciences Research and professor of medicine and pediatrics at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee, co-directed the research with Seibold.

“We had hypothesized that asthma and allergic diseases might reduce the risk of infection based on the findings that there are fewer receptors (ACE2 receptor) for SARS-CoV-2 on the surface of airway cells in people with certain types of inflammation seen with allergy,” Hartert said. Newsweek. “This should mean that fewer viruses could get inside the cells of the airways in people with asthma and allergies. However, we only found a lower risk of infection in people with food allergies.”

There were findings beyond food allergies and asthma, including the finding that children play a critical role as a reservoir of asymptomatic infection and household transmission. Seibold and Hartert said about 75% of infections in children were asymptomatic and, as Hartert said, attending school in person “was the greatest risk factor for introducing an infection into a household.” .

“There was even more circulation of the virus than was recognized due to the extent of asymptomatic infection, especially among young people,” Seibold added.

The study also showed that an increasing body mass index (BMI) was associated with an increased risk of infection. Essentially, the higher the BMI, the higher the risk of infection, as Hartert described.

Seibold said doctors have long known that obesity is a risk factor for severe COVID, but this study “found that people who are obese or overweight are more likely to be affected” due to a linear relationship. between BMI or an increase in fat composition, and an increase in infection.

Confirming the results and identifying the mechanisms of decreasing the risk of infection in people with food allergy and increasing the risk of BMI could be very interesting to identify strategies to prevent the establishment of infection.

Dr. Tina Hartert

Hartert said the all-remote study involved “remarkable” participating households, “in that they were both study participants and their own research team” – including collecting their own nose samples before infection, during infection and after infection.

“Confirming the results and identifying the mechanisms of decreased risk of infection in people with food allergies and increased risk of BMI could be of great interest in identifying strategies to prevent the establishment of the infection,” she said.

One study, with research conducted at the University of Kansas, found that “conversion messages” were quite effective in encouraging vaccine hesitants.

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Maraviroc appears to treat more than just HIV; Unnecessary antibiotics harmful to children https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/maraviroc-appears-to-treat-more-than-just-hiv-unnecessary-antibiotics-harmful-to-children/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 12:38:03 +0000 https://parentsofallergicchildren.org/maraviroc-appears-to-treat-more-than-just-hiv-unnecessary-antibiotics-harmful-to-children/ Learn about the biggest pharmaceutical developments and pricing stories from the past week in KHN’s Prescription Drug Watch roundup. NPR: Promising treatment for memory loss could be HIV drug An HIV drug, known as maraviroc, may have another unexpected use. The drug appears to restore a type of memory that allows us to link an […]]]>

Learn about the biggest pharmaceutical developments and pricing stories from the past week in KHN’s Prescription Drug Watch roundup.

NPR: Promising treatment for memory loss could be HIV drug

An HIV drug, known as maraviroc, may have another unexpected use. The drug appears to restore a type of memory that allows us to link an event, such as a wedding, to the people we saw there, a team reports in this week’s issue of the journal Nature. (Hamilton, 5/28)

CIDRAP: Inappropriate antibiotics for children linked to adverse events, higher costs

New research suggests that the negative consequences of inappropriately prescribing antibiotics in children with common infections are not limited to antibiotic resistance. The study, published yesterday in JAMA Network Open, found that children who received inappropriate or non-recommended antibiotics for common viral and bacterial infections had an increased risk of adverse side effects such as Clostridioides difficile infection, severe allergic reactions and skin rashes. The extra medical care needed to deal with these adverse events resulted in about $74 million in excess healthcare costs in 2017. (Dall, 5/27)

CIDRAP: New ASPR report reveals frayed and fractured US drug supply chains

A new U.S. government report characterizes the risks in 100-day supply chains of 143 essential prescription drugs, including 86 priority drugs deemed essential to the health of Americans. The vulnerability of these supply chains, which underpins drug shortages, has been exposed by the pandemic and other recent natural disasters, such as the hurricanes in Puerto Rico. (Van Beusekom, 05/27)

Statistic: Counterfeit pills continue to circulate as new law takes effect

As far as Shane Jerominski was concerned, the many bottles of a widely used anti-HIV drug he dispensed in his pharmacy nearly two years ago sounded great. This turned out to be wrong. A patient then returned a prescription because it contained the wrong pill. It turned out that someone had tampered with the foil seals, replacing the legitimate pills with counterfeit drugs before resealing the bottles and shipping them to pharmacies across the country. (Silverman and Wosen, 5/31)

American Academy of Pediatrics: Postnatal corticosteroids to prevent or treat chronic lung disease after premature birth

The American Academy of Pediatrics continues to provide guidance on the use of postnatal corticosteroids to manage or prevent chronic lung disease after preterm birth (formerly known as bronchopulmonary dysplasia). (Cummings, MD, MS, FAAP and Pramanik, MD, FAAP, 5/30)

ScienceDaily: Scientists solve a long-standing mystery: Why do some asthma patients respond poorly to treatment?

Patients with the most severe form of asthma produce special substances in their airways when they take medications during an asthma attack that stop the treatment from working, according to a study where Rutgers scientists have collaborated with researchers from Genentech, a member of the Roche group. (Rutgers University, 5/30)

FiercePharma: Priority Review of Sanofi’s Dupixent for Prurigo Nodularis

Sanofi and Regeneron’s Dupixent is on fire. A week after getting the first FDA approval for eosinophilic esophagitis, the drug gained priority review for prurigo nodularis. If it wins the agency’s blessing, Dupixent would be the first FDA-approved treatment for the disease. The agency’s target date for a decision is Sept. 30, Sanofi said Tuesday. (Becker, 5/30)

Reuters: FDA presses trial pause for over-the-counter version of anti-impotence drug Cialis

The US health regulator has suspended a trial to assess the switch from prescription erectile dysfunction drug Cialis to an over-the-counter (OTC) treatment, French drugmaker Sanofi (SASY.PA) said on Monday. The pause is linked to concerns about the way the trial protocol was designed, the company said, adding that no patients had so far been recruited for the study. (Hummel and Grover, 5/30)

This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage by major news outlets. Sign up for an email subscription.

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